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  • EnCambio - Estanislao Bachrach July 23, 2017
    EnCambio te va a permitir alumbrar los procesos por los cuales te comportás de determinada manera con el fin de dejar atrás aquellos hábitos y conductas que ya no te sirven. El objetivo es que aprendas del potencial que tiene tu cerebro para cambiar y la capacidad que tenés vos para modificarlo. Este año cambio de trabajo, empiezo el gimnasio, bajo esos kili […]
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  • La teoría del todo - Stephen W. Hawking July 23, 2017
    Una manera clara y amena de acercarse a los misterios del universo. En esta esclarecedora obra, el gran físico británico Stephen Hawking nos ofrece una historia del universo, del big bang a los agujeros negros. En siete pasos, Hawking logra explicar la historia del universo, desde las primeras teorías del mundo griego y de la época medieval hasta las más com […]
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  • El gran diseño - Stephen Hawking & Leonard Mlodinow July 23, 2017
    Aun antes de aparecer, este libro ha venido precedido, en todos los medios de comunicación, de una extraordinaria polémica sobre  sus conclusiones: que tanto nuestro universo como los otros muchos universos posibles surgieron de la nada, porque su creación no requiere de la intervención de ningún Dios o ser sobrenatural, sino que todos los universos pro […]
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  • Sobre la teoría de la relatividad especial y general - Albert Einstein July 23, 2017
    Entre el Electromagnetismo y la Mecánica newtoniana existe una fórmula de bisagra: la teoría de la relatividad especial y general. La importancia del nuevo marco planteado por Albert Einstein se entiende por lo siguiente: la percepción del tiempo y el espacio es relativa al observador. ¿Qué significa esto? Si usted viaja a una velocidad mayor que la de la lu […]
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  • La física del futuro - Michio Kaku July 23, 2017
    Un recorrido asombroso a través de los próximos cien años de revolución científica. El futuro ya se está inventando en los laboratorios de los científicos más punteros de todo el mundo. Con toda probabilidad, en 2100 controlaremos los ordenadores a través de diminutos sensores cerebrales y podremos mover objetos con el poder de nuestras mentes, la inteligenc […]
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  • Breve historia de mi vida - Stephen Hawking July 23, 2017
    La mente maravillosa de Stephen Hawking ha deslumbrado al mundo entero revelando los misterios del universo. Ahora, por primera vez, el cosmólogo más brillante de nuestra era explora, con una mirada reveladora, su propia vida y evolución intelectual. Breve historia de mi vida cuenta el sorprendente viaje de Stephen Hawking desde su niñez […]
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  • Ágilmente - Estanislao Bachrach July 23, 2017
    Bachrach es Doctor en biología molecular y explica el funcionamiento del cerebro. A través de ello, da consejos y herramientas para ser más creativos y felices en el trabajo y en la vida. La neurociencia es clara: el cerebro aprende hasta el último día de vida. La creatividad puede expandirse. Tu mente, mediante la aplicación de las técnicas correctas, puede […]
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  • Tricks Any Dog Can Do! - Susan Day July 23, 2017
    This great book comes with advice and guidance as to the best way to teach these tricks. It offers more than one method which the reader can choose depending upon their own situation. There is also advice to using treats and shows you how to not end up with a treat junkie! This books is from the desk of Susan Day, a canine behaviourist. Susan teaches obedien […]
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  • ¿Cómo pensar como Sherlock Holmes? - Maria Konnikova July 23, 2017
    Ningún personaje de ficción es más conocido por sus poderes de intuición y observación que Sherlock Holmes. Pero, ¿es su inteligencia extraordinaria una invención de la ficción o podemos aprender a desarrollar estas habilidades, para mejorar nuestras vidas en el trabajo y en casa? A través de ¿ Cómo pensar como Sherlock Holmes? , la periodista y psicóloga Ma […]
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  • El futuro de nuestra mente - Michio Kaku July 23, 2017
    Una nueva teoría sobre la conciencia y el futuro de los estudios de nuestra mente Por primera vez en la historia, gracias a escáneres de alta tecnología diseñados por físicos, se han desvelado secretos del cerebro, y lo que un día fuera territorio de la ciencia ficción, se ha convertido en una asombrosa realidad. Grabación de recuerdos, telepatía, vídeos de […]
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This Family Is Mourning Their Dad With a Website Dedicated to Late Packers Fans

Some of the most passionate sports fans in the world—the Americans who mount cheese blocks on their noggins and endure sub-zero temperatures at Lambeau Field to pull for the Green Bay Packers—now have a home to share memories of deceased relatives and friends who bled Packer green and gold. To honor their late father Bill Snyder, a native of the appropriately-named Hartland, Wisc. who died of a sudden heart attack on Feb. 7, Steve Snyder, a journalist and former editor at TIME, and Jeff Snyder, an urban affairs professor at Cleveland State University, created greatestpackerfan.com. In an open letter that ran in Sunday’s Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, the Snyders wrote: “It’s nice to have a friendly shoulder to cry on, in these sports pages he always read, next to the same Packers bylines he cherished. And if you’ve lost someone from our pack, and could benefit from an open ear, please just write us. We’re in a hugging mood, are eager to hear more about the best Packers fans. You can e-mail us stories at GreatestPackersFan@gmail.com and we’re going to start chronicling these profiles of everyday Packers heroes over at GreatestPackersFan.com.” Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel In the 1980s, Bill Snyder was a manager at Farrell’s Ice Cream Parlor in Milwaukee. For the past 25 years, he worked at Stein Optical and Visionworks stores in the Milwaukee area. Like so many Wisconsinites, Snyder lived for Sundays, and Packers football: after Brett Favre thew a 54-yard touchdown pass to Andre Rison in Super Bowl XXXI, which Green Bay won, the Synders never saw their dad happier. “Our dad vaulted from his chair, fell to his knees, screamed to the heavens,” the Snyders wrote. Bill Snyder sent his last text after the New England Patriots finished off their historic Super Bowl comeback win against the Atlanta Falcons. “Great Super Bowl,” Snyder wrote. “The Pack coulda won.” […]

Exaggerating the value of wetlands for natural disaster mitigation is a risky business

Globally the frequency of natural disasters has more than doubled over the past 35 years. CGIAR/Challenge food and water programme, Author provided Matthew McCartney, Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research and Max Finlayson, Charles Sturt University As climate change increases the frequency and severity and heightens the risks?of many natural hazards, the role of wetlands in disaster risk reduction, is gaining prominence. Wetlands can reduce the impacts of natural hazards. In the aftermath of hurricanes, floods or tsunamis, they often play an important role in getting communities back on their feet […]

At the Super Bowl LI, Tom Brady Plots Revenge

Well, this is good. You’re reading a story about another New England Patriots victory in the AFC championship game, and unlike two years ago, Tom Brady hasn’t been accused of puncturing any footballs. Looks like no ridiculous sports scandal will consume the nation’s attention in the lead-up to the Super Bowl, which is a relief. Washington’s already giving America a steaming plate of silliness. No one’s itching for Deflategate II. We’re in the clear, correct? Having dominated the Pittsburgh Steelers, by a score of 36-17, in a wet and uninspiring AFC championship game, Brady and the Pats will make their seventh Super Bowl appearance of the Brady-Bill Belichick era. On Feb. 5 in Houston, New England will face the Atlanta Falcons, who blew out the Green Bay Packers 44-21 earlier on Sunday. Seems like last week’s thrilling Packers-Cowboys/Steelers-Chiefs doubleheader sucked all the drama out of this year’s postseason: each of the remaining eight playoff games were decided by at least two touchdowns. Stories about ratings declines and a boring playoff have shrouded this NFL season; at least Super Bowl LI has the potential to spice things up. In a (hopefully) scandal-free affair, the ageless Brady goes for a fifth Super Bowl win, which will be a record for a starting quarterback, while simultaneously avenging this season’s 4-game suspension for the entirely overblown Deflategate controversy. New England shouldn’t roll over Atlanta Falcons, who are coached by Dan Quinn, the former coordinator for those historically excellent Seattle Seahawks defenses a few years back. Fingers crossed for a close game. Read More: In a Blowout, Atlanta Falcons Routs Green Bay Packers 44-21 For the NFC Title At this point, Brady, 39, will seemingly try any goofy endeavor to maintain prime form. Whether it’s subsisting on quinoa and millet, wearing (supposedly) sleep-inducing jammy pants, and during the AFC title game, donning a ridiculously oversized jacket, apparently stuffed with granite, to protect him from the ravages of the Foxborough winter. Whatever he’s doing, it’s working. Against Pittsburgh in the AFC championship, Brady was nearly flawless, throwing for 342 yards on 32-44 passing, with three touchdown tosses and no interceptions. He’s relieving yet another wide receiver from anonymity: world, meet Chris Hogan, a former Penn State lacrosse player who spent a single year playing college football not for the Nittany Lions, but for Monmouth as a grad student. The former part-time receiver at the tiny Jersey shore school, whom no NFL team drafted, is now catching flea-flickers from Tom Brady for 34-yard touchdowns, on his way to a nine-catch, 180 yard, two-touchdown outing in the AFC championship game. What about the Falcons? Well, they’re not the Packers or Cowboys, one of the two true national franchises from the NFC who once had a shot to meet the Pats in Houston. A Pats-Pack or Pats-Boys matchup would have raised the profile of this Super Bowl. But Atlanta’s no mere consolation. The Falcons had been creeping up for years after drafting Boston College QB Matt Ryan in 2008. But they always stumbled in the playoffs, before finishing no higher than .500 the past three years. Atlanta revived itself under Ryan and Quinn this season. Falcons GM Thomas Dimitroff, former head of college scouting for New England, honed in on Ryan as a franchise quarterback because he reminded him of Brady: Matty Ice, as Ryan’s known, was smooth under pressure. After finishing 2016 with nearly 5,000 passing yards, he’s the likely NFL MVP. The backfield’s deep — running backs Devonta Freeman and Tevin Coleman combined to gain 2,482 yards from scrimmage during the regular season, the most of any duo in the NFL. The defense is young, fast and physical. Atlanta shut out Aaron Rodgers and the Packers in the first half of the NFC championship game. Atlanta’s never won a Super Bowl. The franchise is making just its second big game appearance, and its first since 1999. Given this disparity with the dynastic Pats, the Falcons may feel like an underdog tale, though New England’s just a three-point favorite at the outset. But if there’s any year to betray your instinct to pull for an upset, or root hard against Belichick’s evil empire, it’s probably this the one. Picture Roger Goodell, a man who fought Brady in court and painted him a cheater, handing the Super Bowl MVP trophy over to the Pats superstar. Awkward, delicious, and a perfect script. […]

Hurricane Matthew struck South Carolina, weakened but dangerous.

Six of the eight U.S. senators from Florida, Georgia, and the Carolinas are climate deniers, rejecting the consensus of 99.98 percent of peer-reviewed scientific papers that human activity is causing global warming. The exceptions are South Carolina’s Lindsey Graham and Florida’s Bill Nelson — the lone Democrat of the bunch.

Here are some of the lowlights from their comments on the climate change:

-Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, who does not understand the difference between climate and weather, arguing against climate action in a presidential debate in March: “As far as a law that we can pass in Washington to change the weather, there’s no such thing.”

-Back in 2011, North Carolina Sen. Richard Burr said: “I have no clue [how much of climate change is attributable to human activity], and I don’t think that science can prove it.”

-In 2014, North Carolina Sen. Thom Tillis claimed that “the liberal agenda, the Obama agenda, the [then Sen.] Kay Hagan agenda, is trying to use [climate change] as a Trojan horse for their energy policy.”

-Georgia Sen. Johnny Isakson offered his analysis last year on whether the Greenland ice sheet is melting (it is): “There are mixed reviews on that, and there’s mixed scientific evidence on that.”

-Georgia Sen. David Perdue told Slate in 2014 that “in science, there’s an active debate going on,” about whether carbon emissions are behind climate change.

[…]

For the first time in years, the cost of electricity at home has gone down.

Six of the eight U.S. senators from Florida, Georgia, and the Carolinas are climate deniers, rejecting the consensus of 99.98 percent of peer-reviewed scientific papers that human activity is causing global warming. The exceptions are South Carolina’s Lindsey Graham and Florida’s Bill Nelson — the lone Democrat of the bunch.

Here are some of the lowlights from their comments on the climate change:

-Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, who does not understand the difference between climate and weather, arguing against climate action in a presidential debate in March: “As far as a law that we can pass in Washington to change the weather, there’s no such thing.”

-Back in 2011, North Carolina Sen. Richard Burr said: “I have no clue [how much of climate change is attributable to human activity], and I don’t think that science can prove it.”

-In 2014, North Carolina Sen. Thom Tillis claimed that “the liberal agenda, the Obama agenda, the [then Sen.] Kay Hagan agenda, is trying to use [climate change] as a Trojan horse for their energy policy.”

-Georgia Sen. Johnny Isakson offered his analysis last year on whether the Greenland ice sheet is melting (it is): “There are mixed reviews on that, and there’s mixed scientific evidence on that.”

-Georgia Sen. David Perdue told Slate in 2014 that “in science, there’s an active debate going on,” about whether carbon emissions are behind climate change.

[…]

The restaurant that employs grandmas instead of chefs

A flock of ‘nonnas’ dish up the ultimate comfort food at this NYC restaurant. […]

The Obama administration was planning to resume deporting Haitians before the hurricane hit.

Six of the eight U.S. senators from Florida, Georgia, and the Carolinas are climate deniers, rejecting the consensus of 99.98 percent of peer-reviewed scientific papers that human activity is causing global warming. The exceptions are South Carolina’s Lindsey Graham and Florida’s Bill Nelson — the lone Democrat of the bunch.

Here are some of the lowlights from their comments on the climate change:

-Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, who does not understand the difference between climate and weather, arguing against climate action in a presidential debate in March: “As far as a law that we can pass in Washington to change the weather, there’s no such thing.”

-Back in 2011, North Carolina Sen. Richard Burr said: “I have no clue [how much of climate change is attributable to human activity], and I don’t think that science can prove it.”

-In 2014, North Carolina Sen. Thom Tillis claimed that “the liberal agenda, the Obama agenda, the [then Sen.] Kay Hagan agenda, is trying to use [climate change] as a Trojan horse for their energy policy.”

-Georgia Sen. Johnny Isakson offered his analysis last year on whether the Greenland ice sheet is melting (it is): “There are mixed reviews on that, and there’s mixed scientific evidence on that.”

-Georgia Sen. David Perdue told Slate in 2014 that “in science, there’s an active debate going on,” about whether carbon emissions are behind climate change.

[…]