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As Trump Appeals to Farmers, Some of His Policies Don’t

NYT

The rest is here: As Trump Appeals to Farmers, Some of His Policies Don’t

As Trump Appeals to Farmers, Some of His Policies Don’t

“What we often see communicated about rural America is that there are these isolated pockets of despair that are beyond hope or recovery,” Ray Starling, the special assistant to the president for agriculture, agricultural trade and food assistance on the National Economic Council, said in a briefing Friday. The report makes clear that “that’s not what we believe.”Yet some of the president’s economic policies could actually harm the farm industry. New analyses of the tax law by economists at the Department of Agriculture suggest it could actually lower farm output in the years to come and effectively raise taxes on the lowest-earning farm households, while delivering large gains for the richest farmers.And the administration’s trade policies continue to be a concern for farmers, who benefit from access to other markets, including by exporting their products. Mr. Trump continues to threaten to withdraw from trade pacts if other countries do not grant the United States a better deal, a position that has put him at odds with much of the farm industry.“Trade has become an increasingly important and substantial part of the ag economy. So anything that causes a ripple in that can have not just little effects but significant effects,” said Dale Moore, the executive director for public policy at the Farm Bureau.Indeed, part of the White House report Monday is expected to discuss global markets’ importance to rural America.Agriculture has been the biggest beneficiary of pacts like the North American Free Trade Agreement, which have allowed the United States to export grains and meat. In April, when the president came to the brink of withdrawing the United States from the pact, Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue helped to dissuade him by showing him a map of the part of the country that would be hardest hit — farming states that also helped to elect Mr. Trump.“It creates a lot of anxiety across all of agriculture, particularly the U.S. pulling out of Nafta,” said Kevin Kester, a rancher in California and the president-elect of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association.Continue reading the main storyFarmers and ranchers like Mr. Kester worry that they are losing ground to foreign competitors, as major markets like Japan, Europe and Mexico push ahead with their own trade pacts. […]

State of the Art: What the Tax Bill Fails to Address: Technology’s Tsunami

NYT

View original here: State of the Art: What the Tax Bill Fails to Address: Technology’s Tsunami

The Winners and Losers in the Tax Bill

NYT

Excerpt from: The Winners and Losers in the Tax Bill

With 2020 Census Looming, Worries About Fairness and Accuracy

“There’s a set of unprecedented challenges that collectively threaten to create a perfect storm in 2020,” Terri Ann Lowenthal, a consultant and a leading authority on the census, said in an interview. “If public confidence in the objectivity and quality of the 2020 census erodes, then another pillar of our representative democracy could be compromised.”John H […]

The Opioid Crisis: An Epidemic Years in the Making

SectionsSEARCHSkip to contentSkip to site indexSubscribeLog In SubscribeLog InAdvertisementU.S.The Opioid Crisis: An Epidemic Years in the MakingBy Maya Salam Oct. 26, 2017ImageExamining the body of a woman who died of an overdose in August.CreditTodd Heisler/The New York TimesThe current opioid epidemic is the deadliest drug crisis in American history. Overdoses, fueled by opioids, are the leading cause of death for Americans under 50 years old — killing roughly 64,000 people last year, more than guns or car accidents, and doing so at a pace faster than the H.I.V. epidemic did at its peak. President Trump declared the opioid crisis a “public health emergency” on Thursday. Administration officials expect the directive to quickly lead to crucial changes, which have the potential to help rural areas ravaged by opioid use, where doctors are often in short supply. The New York Times has been covering the outbreak — from when it started bubbling up in towns around the United States years ago to now, as it decimates communities and families. […]

Trump to Declare Opioid Crisis a ‘Public Health Emergency’

NYT

See the rest here: Trump to Declare Opioid Crisis a ‘Public Health Emergency’