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Trump Rules: When Picking Apples on a Farm With 5,000 Rules, Watch Out for the Ladders

“So many of the farmers I’ve spoken with tell me that stricter and stricter regulations have put many of their neighbors and friends out of business, and in doing so cost them their homes, land and livelihoods,” said Baylen Linnekin, a libertarian-leaning expert in food law and policy, in an email. “For many farmers, rolling back regulations is the only way they can survive.”“The Number of Rules on Ladders Alone!”After a lifetime of navigating his family’s agricultural business, Mr. Ten Eyck has a firm appreciation for the rules and regulations that are good and helpful, as well as those that are excessive and ill-advised.He fluently speaks the language of government compliance, rattling off acronyms that consume his time and resources, including E.P.A. (Environmental Protection Agency), O.S.H.A. (Occupational Safety and Health Administration), U.S.D.A. (United States Department of Agriculture) and state and local offices, too, like A.C.D.O.H. (Albany County Department of Health).During the Obama administration, food and worker safety were particular priorities among regulators, Mr. Ten Eyck said […]

Amazon Plans to Lower Some Prices at Whole Foods

Investors drove Kroger shares down more than 8 percent on Thursday; shares of Walmart, the nation’s biggest grocer, fell about 2 percent. Both companies’ shares also fell sharply when the deal was announced in June.Amazon plans to weave together its online business and physical stores by turning its Prime membership program into a Whole Foods rewards program, providing additional savings to customers. Amazon Prime is a $99-a-year service that gives customers faster free shipping, video streaming and other benefits.Whole Foods’ private-label products will be available through Amazon’s online services and Amazon lockers that will be installed in some Whole Foods markets. Customers will also be able to return online orders to Amazon through the lockers.“We’re determined to make healthy and organic food affordable for everyone,” Jeff Wilke, the executive who runs Amazon’s consumer businesses, said on Thursday in an announcement about the changes. “Everybody should be able to eat Whole Foods Market quality.”Discounts are not the only reason shoppers use Amazon — selection and convenience are others — but Mr. Bezos has never been shy about starting price wars that inflict pain on rivals. In the 1990s, the company tussled with Barnes & Noble to see which could discount books the most. Amazon and Walmart have been in an on-and-off price war in a variety of categories for years.In its battle with Quidsi, a start-up that owned Diapers.com, Amazon put so much pressure on the company that it eventually agreed to be acquired by Amazon rather than by Walmart.Ever since Amazon made the surprise announcement in June that it was acquiring Whole Foods for more than $13 billion, competitors have expected it to shake things up at the grocer, which has struggled in the face of competition from Costco, Walmart and others that have wooed customers with a growing selection of organic produce and kitchen staples. (Gabrielle Sulzberger, a private equity executive who is married to Arthur O. Sulzberger Jr., the chairman and publisher of The New York Times, is the chairwoman of Whole Foods.)Continue reading the main storyStill, the speed with which Amazon completed the acquisition and embarked on a price-cutting campaign is stunning. […]

Impossible Foods hopes to replace all meat in the human diet someday

It’s an ambitious, though slightly unrealistic, goal for the inventors of the bleeding veggie burger. […]

Sonic launches part-mushroom, part-beef burger

It’s not a veggie burger. But there’s a lot less beef in it than normal. […]

Medicaid, Pelosi, Trump: Your Weekend Briefing

#briefing-market-module.interactive-embedded .interactive-caption { display: none; } Market Snapshot View Full Overview ____ Photo Credit Bryan Anselm for The New York Times 8. The other big business story involves groceries. […]

State of the Art: How Battling Brands Online Has Gained Urgency, and Impact

But the effects of these campaigns go beyond business. In a nation where politics have grown pitched and sclerotic, fighting brands online suddenly feels like the most effective political action many of us can take. Posting a hashtag — #deleteUber, for instance, or #grabyourwallet — and threatening to back it up by withholding dollars can bring about a much quicker, more visible change in the world than, say, calling your representative.Continue reading the main storyBrand-focused online activism can work for every political side, too: Don’t like a New York theater company’s Trump-tinged production of Shakespeare in the Park? There’s a boycott for you, and Delta and Bank of America will give in.Yet the mechanics of social media suggest it will be the cultural and political left, more than the right, that might win the upper hand with this tactic — especially when harnessing the power of brands to fight larger battles for racial and gender equality, as in the Uber and Fox News cases.“Women and people of color have gravitated to social media and were early adopters of it,” said Shannon Coulter, a marketing consultant who co-founded Grab Your Wallet, a campaign aimed at urging retailers to stop selling Trump-branded products. “Social media is actually a lever for social justice. It’s a way of leveling the playing field.”To see why, we must first understand why brands are suddenly more vulnerable to consumer sentiment than they once were. It all comes down to one thing: Social media is the new TV.In the era when television shaped mainstream consumer sentiment, companies enjoyed enormous power to alter their image through advertising. Then came the internet, which didn’t kill advertising, but did dilute its power. Brands now have little say over how their messages get chewed up through our social feeds.Newsletter Sign UpContinue reading the main storyThank you for subscribing.An error has occurred. Please try again later.You are already subscribed to this email.View all New York Times newsletters.Yes, they can run ads on Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat and everyplace else […]

Parkway Sign Lettering Altered to Read ‘Crooked Hillary’

(BRENTWOOD, N.Y.) — A sign marking the Crooked Hill Road exit off a suburban New York parkway has been altered to read “Crooked Hillary.” Newsday reports the defaced green traffic sign on the Sagtikos Parkway on Long Island was reported to the state Department of Transportation on Wednesday. A sign marking the Crooked Hill Road exit on the Sagtikos Parkway was defaced to “Crooked Hillary,” officials said https://t.co/7KBwLtEuWt pic.twitter.com/JwX2lEIRKq — Newsday (@Newsday) June 15, 2017 A DOT spokesman says the sign has been removed and “defacing public signs is illegal.” Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump often used the moniker “Crooked Hillary” when referring to Democratic opponent Hillary Clinton, who at the time suffered from the mistrust of many voters. Trump won the election and in a recent tweet said “Crooked Hillary Clinton now blames everybody but herself, refuses to say she was a terrible candidate.” Clinton tweeted back “People in covfefe houses shouldn’t throw covfefe,” a dig at Trump for tweeting the mystifying nonword. […]