DreamHost

TARGET: Save with the Red Card!

Subscribe

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Green Apps

ITUNES TV AND MOVIES

Categories

Burpee Gardening

Whole House Water Filter

PINGO

Soft Phone Banner

RE USE IT!

ReUseIt.com

Natural Mosquito Control

10% Off Mosquito Magnet Accessories - Use Code MMACCTEN

FTC Disclosure

Green Reflection may receive remuneration from the advertisers on this site.

Al Franken had to explain the scientific method to Rick Perry.

The nation’s largest privately owned coal company, Murray Energy, just filed a lawsuit against the Last Week Tonight host over the show’s recent segment. Oliver had criticized the company’s CEO, Robert Murray, for acting carelessly toward miners’ safety.

Murray Energy’s complaint stated that the segment was a “meticulously planned attempt to assassinate the character and reputation” of Murray by broadcasting “false, injurious, and defamatory comments.”

Oliver shouldn’t be too concerned, according to Ken White, a First Amendment litigator at Los Angeles firm, who told the Daily Beast that the complaint was “frivolous and vexatious.”

The lawsuit is hardly a shocking development. Before the show aired, Oliver received a cease-and-desist letter from the company. He noted that Murray has a history of filing defamation suits against news outlets (most recently, the New York Times).

Oliver said in the episode, “I know that you are probably going to sue me, but you know what, I stand by everything I said.”

[…]

California Today: California Today: Hollywood’s Comeback

Supported byU.S.California Today: Hollywood’s ComebackPhotoThe view from behind the Hollywood sign of the neighborhood where once-forgotten soundstages are thriving again.Credit Chad Ress for The New York TimesGood morning.(Want to get California Today by email? Here’s the sign-up.)Today’s introduction is by Brooks Barnes, our Hollywood reporter based in Los Angeles.Five years ago, there was no sadder stretch of Hollywood, the neighborhood, than the one left for dead by Hollywood, the industry.Soundstages at Sunset Boulevard and Bronson Avenue looked as though they had not been updated in decades, perhaps since Warner Bros […]

SoCal Business Leaders Send Open Letter To EPA Chief Warning Against Rollback Of Environmental Regulations

Today the Los Angeles Business Council sent an urgent warning to Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt that recent efforts to rollback climate change policies, including the Energy Star program, will damage our economy, slow job growth, and put the environment at risk. The letter was sent on behalf of the LABC’s 450 members who represent a cross-section of sectors including utilities, healthcare, real estate and finance. The full text of the letter is below: Dear Administrator Pruitt, On behalf of the Los Angeles Business Council, which represents over 450 influential businesses across virtually every industry, we urge you to stop the rollback of key environmental regulations. As business leaders, we have a unique perspective on how environmental regulations have not only improved our citizens’ quality of life, but significantly grown our local economy. We share the sentiment of the recently sent letter to President Trump by the Mayors National Climate Action Agenda, co-founded by Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, opposing recent actions to roll back the Clean Power Plan, reduce vehicle fuel efficiency standards, and propose budget cuts to the EPA and critical programs such as Energy Star. There is overwhelming evidence showing that investment in clean energy and other environmentally-friendly initiatives spur job growth: Over 500,000 Californians are now employed by the clean energy industry, where wages are higher than average, and well-paying, entry-level blue collar jobs are a reality. Overall, renewable energy has the potential to be cleaner, safer, and more cost-efficient than traditional fossil fuels. As a group devoted to promoting business interests in the Los Angeles region, we respectfully request that you do not overlook the economic benefits of policies that incentivize renewable energy use and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. These impacts reverberate across many industries: they reduce costs in the long-term, encourage research and development in job-producing industries, and save millions in public health costs. We are especially concerned about the rollback of the Energy Star program. […]

Major TV networks spent just 50 minutes on climate change — combined — last year.

Nanette Barragán is used to facing off against polluters. Elected in 2013 to the city council of Hermosa Beach, California, she took on E&B Natural Resources, an oil and gas company looking to drill wells on the beach. Barragán, an attorney before going into politics, learned of the potential project and began campaigning for residents to vote against it. The project was eventually squashed. In November, she won a congressional seat in California’s 44th district.

To Barragán, making sure President Trump’s environmental rollbacks don’t affect communities is a matter of life or death. The district she represents, the same in which she grew up, encompasses heavily polluted parts of Los Angeles County — areas crisscrossed with freeways and dotted with oil and gas wells. Barragan says she grew up close to a major highway and suffered from allergies. “I now go back and wonder if it was related to living that close,” she says.

Exide Technologies, a battery manufacturer that has polluted parts of southeast Los Angeles County with arsenic, lead, and other chemicals for years, sits just outside her district’s borders. Barragán’s district is also 69 percent Latino and 15 percent black. She has become acutely aware of the environmental injustices of the pollution plaguing the region. “People who are suffering are in communities of color,” she says.

Now in the nation’s capital, Barragán is chair of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus’s newly formed environmental task force and a member of the House Committee on Natural Resources, which considers legislation on topics like energy and public lands and is chaired by climate denier Rob Bishop, a Utah Republican. She knows the next four years will be tough but says she’s up for the challenge. “I think it’s going to be, I hate to say it, a lot of defense.”


Meet all the fixers on this year’s Grist 50.

[…]

The Trump administration is about to officially OK the Keystone XL pipeline.

Nanette Barragán is used to facing off against polluters. Elected in 2013 to the city council of Hermosa Beach, California, she took on E&B Natural Resources, an oil and gas company looking to drill wells on the beach. Barragán, an attorney before going into politics, learned of the potential project and began campaigning for residents to vote against it. The project was eventually squashed. In November, she won a congressional seat in California’s 44th district.

To Barragán, making sure President Trump’s environmental rollbacks don’t affect communities is a matter of life or death. The district she represents, the same in which she grew up, encompasses heavily polluted parts of Los Angeles County — areas crisscrossed with freeways and dotted with oil and gas wells. Barragan says she grew up close to a major highway and suffered from allergies. “I now go back and wonder if it was related to living that close,” she says.

Exide Technologies, a battery manufacturer that has polluted parts of southeast Los Angeles County with arsenic, lead, and other chemicals for years, sits just outside her district’s borders. Barragán’s district is also 69 percent Latino and 15 percent black. She has become acutely aware of the environmental injustices of the pollution plaguing the region. “People who are suffering are in communities of color,” she says.

Now in the nation’s capital, Barragán is chair of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus’s newly formed environmental task force and a member of the House Committee on Natural Resources, which considers legislation on topics like energy and public lands and is chaired by climate denier Rob Bishop, a Utah Republican. She knows the next four years will be tough but says she’s up for the challenge. “I think it’s going to be, I hate to say it, a lot of defense.”


Meet all the fixers on this year’s Grist 50.

[…]

Obama’s Interior makes it easier to build renewable energy on public land in Trump era.

Protestors with forest advocacy group Stand erected a giant, cardinal-red coffee cup in Seattle’s Westlake Center on Thursday, pressuring Starbucks to make its holiday cups recyclable.

Starbucks has struggled with reinventing its disposable products for years. It aimed to make all of its cups reusable or recyclable by 2015, but that hasn’t happened yet.

The night before, Westlake Center had been the site of a large protest against Donald Trump, who promises to gut existing measures to fight climate change.

So why focus on cups? Stand’s U.S. Campaign Director Ross Hammond told us: “Where we can make change is forcing companies to do things they should be doing but don’t want to do.”

Patrons of the original Starbucks store in Pike Place Market — a few blocks from the protest — had a different take:

“I don’t know how we can go from the [Trump] protests last night … to protesting red cups,” said Steph K., 28, of Los Angeles. We have a national identity crisis, she said, and “this is what we’re talking about?”

Starbucks told Grist that it is “committed to reducing the impact of waste generated in our stores,” and that its cups are recyclable in some places, like Seattle, already.

[…]

Prop 64 Gains Major Newspaper Endorsements

The campaign behind California’s Proposition 64 to legalize cannabis for everyone 21 and older announced that they’ve received the official endorsement of the San Diego Union-Tribune. According to the Yes on Prop 64 campaign, this means that “every large-circulation daily newspaper in Southern California has now endorsed Proposition 64.” The endorsement from the Union-Tribune is The post Prop 64 Gains Major Newspaper Endorsements appeared first on The Weed Blog. […]