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How to make compost: The only video tutorial you’ll need

What you can compost, and how to manage it, by no-dig gardening expert Charles Dowding. […]

You can hang your chair on the wall if it’s an Ollie

Here is a clever new design that unfurls with a flourish and retracts with a simple pull of a string. […]

Artist’s fresh ceramic plant sculptures bloom with hundreds of petals

Love plants but don’t have a green thumb? Ceramic sculptures might be a good idea. […]

The Manual of the Dwelling: Lessons in living from Le Corbusier

Well, he was young when he wrote this. […]

Soon our apartment’s front door might be a drone balcony

Visionary engineer Charles Bombardier says we should start preparing for the drone revolution; get ready for the Air-doo. […]

Solar Isn’t the Only Thing That’s Getting Cheaper. So Is Fracking.

Solar Isn’t the Only Thing That’s Getting Cheaper. So Is Fracking.

Posted by on Friday, October 16, 2015

Markets won’t break the grip of fossil fuels. That’s why we need government action.

foxbat/Shutterstock

Solar is exciting. Cheap solar is even more exciting. In fact, the increasing cheapness of solar is the most reliable good news story out there, when you happen to write about climate change.

Yeah, well, not so fast, says Michael Liebreich and Charles Blanchard, over at Bloomberg New Energy Finance. You want to know what else has fallen dramatically in cost over the last few years, besides solar? Drilling for oil and gas, that’s what.

Read the rest at Grist.

Filed under Stories from our Partners · Tagged with

[…]

We Hold These Truths to Be Inconvenient

Among the most sacred rights enumerated in the U.S. Constitution is the ownership and control of private property. It’s not quite as sacred as our God-given right to cruise Main Street with military-style automatic weapons, of course, but still pretty sacred. The Cato Institute, a libertarian think tank founded by Charles Koch and funded by his sons, David and Charles, publishes a Handbook for Policymakers. The Cato handbook calls property rights, “the foundation of every right we have, including the right to be free,” and points out that “John Locke, the philosophical father of the American Revolution and the inspiration for Thomas Jefferson when he drafted the Declaration of Independence, stated the issue simply: ‘Lives, Liberties, and Estates, which I call by the general Name, Property.” “And James Madison, the principal author of the Constitution, echoed those thoughts when he wrote that ”as a man is said to have a right to his property, he may be equally said to have a property in his rights.” These statements of bedrock conservative principle make it a tad contradictory for Congressional Republicans to continue their nearly-manic support for extending the Keystone XL Pipeline through parts of rural Nebraska, which requires a trampling of private property rights. What’s even more incongruous is that the property rights “trampler” being cheered on by Republicans is a foreign corporation. TransCanada has been using the powers of eminent domain to force the sale of land, much of it productive American farmland, from American owners who don’t want to sell, to build its Canadian pipeline. How can a foreign corporation use the eminent domain process to take property in America from Americans? Good question. It’s because they have good lawyers — and lots of them […]