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California Today: California Today: Six Decades of Jasper Johns at the Broad

Some notable loans from other museums include “Three Flags,” (1958); “Flags” (1965), and “Device.” We have also added two major number paintings, “Figure 7” and “Figure 5.”California Online(Please note: We regularly highlight articles on news sites that have limited access for nonsubscribers.)PhotoSpeaker Paul D. Ryan discussed the school shooting during his weekly news conference on Thursday.Credit Eric Thayer for The New York Times• Congress has been unable to pass even modest legislation on guns despite several mass shootings, including the one on Wednesday. “This isn’t going to stop,” a frustrated Senator Dianne Feinstein told her colleagues. “And we become culpable when we do nothing.” [The New York Times]• The Senate has blocked three measures — including one backed by President Trump — that were aimed at resolving the fate of the Dreamers. The lack of consensus leaves uncertainty about whether any solution can be reached. [The New York Times]• State Senator Tony Mendoza has sued the State Senate for suspending him amid a sexual misconduct investigation. He is seeking reinstatement. [The Associated Press]• Peter Thiel, the billionaire investor and co-founder of PayPal, is relocating his home and personal investment firms to Los Angeles from San Francisco […]

What’s in the White House Budget Request?

SubscribeLog In SubscribeLog InAdvertisementPoliticsWhat’s in the White House Budget Request?ImagePresident Trump’s budget proposal would increase military spending by $195 billion over the next two years.CreditAndrew Renneisen/Getty ImagesBy The New York Times Feb. 12, 2018WASHINGTON — The White House released its fiscal 2019 budget on Monday, outlining the administration’s fiscal priorities at a moment when Congress is already moving ahead with its own spending plan. The blueprint is largely a political statement and is unlikely to influence lawmakers, who control the federal pursestrings and just passed a bill, which President Trump signed into law last week, raising spending caps by about $300 billion over two years.That deal, which briefly forced a government shutdown, increases military spending by $195 billion over the next two years and increases nondefense spending by $131 billion over that period. Mr. Trump’s budget proposal calls for a different approach and says Congress should not spend all of those additional nondefense funds […]

SpaceX, North Korea, ‘Black Panther’: Your Tuesday Evening Briefing

#briefing-market-module.interactive-embedded .interactive-caption { display: none; } Market Snapshot View Full Overview ____ Photo Credit Tom Brenner/The New York Times 3. “I’d love to see a shutdown.” That was President Trump, and he could get his wish on Thursday. Congress has yet to agree on a spending deal, which he insists must tighten immigration laws. He spoke to reporters at a meeting with law enforcement officials on gang violence. […]

Government Shutdown, Jerusalem, Super Bowl: Your Evening Briefing

#briefing-market-module.interactive-embedded .interactive-caption { display: none; } Market Snapshot View Full Overview _____ Photo Credit Kyle Johnson for The New York Times 10. Finally, there are no cashiers or registers at Amazon Go, a new mini-market in Seattle that feels like a store of the future. Instead, shoppers — who must have the store’s smartphone app installed — get automatically charged for what they take home, never once needing to pull out a wallet. […]

Government Shutdown Begins as Budget Talks Falter in Senate

“Senate Democrats own the Schumer Shutdown,” the White House press secretary, Sarah Huckabee Sanders, said in a statement. “Tonight, they put politics above our national security, military families, and our country’s ability to serve all Americans.”Democrats, calling it the “Trump shutdown,” countered that Republicans were responsible for the management of a government in their control.GraphicThese Factions in Congress, Split Over ‘Dreamers,’ Could Lead to Government ShutdownA deal to avoid closing the federal government hinges on Senate Democrats, and some Republicans, who want to include protections for young undocumented immigrants.OPEN Graphic“Every American knows the Republican Party controls the White House, the Senate, the House,” Mr. Schumer said. “It’s their job to keep the government open.”In addition to funding government operations through Feb. 16, the House-passed bill would extend funding by six years for the popular Children’s Health Insurance Program, a provision intended to secure Democratic votes.But Democrats were seeking concessions on other priorities, such as protecting young undocumented immigrants from deportation, increasing domestic spending, securing disaster aid for Puerto Rico and bolstering the government’s response to the opioid epidemic.Federal agencies had prepared for the shutdown; on Thursday night, officials at the White House Office of Management and Budget instructed federal agency leaders to give their employees informal notice of who would be furloughed and who would not if funding lapsed.Formal notifications are to be given as early as Saturday morning, budget office officials said, insisting on anonymity to brief reporters about the details of what the White House called “lapse planning and shutdown operations.”Continue reading the main storyMore than one million active-duty military personnel will serve with no lapse, they said, but could not be paid until the shutdown ends. Agencies like the Energy Department that have funding that is not subject to annual appropriations can use that money to stay open, the officials said, and the administration is encouraging them to do so. Most mandatory programs — entitlements such as Social Security that are automatically funded rather than subject to congressional appropriations — can continue without disruption.Officials said Mr. Trump may travel on Air Force One to carry out his constitutional responsibilities, including a planned trip next week to Davos, Switzerland […]

In Trump’s Immigration Remarks, Echoes of a Century-Old Racial Ranking

Its resurfacing in the public sphere capsizes a half-century of mainstream consensus: that immigrants enrich the United States, no matter where they come from.PhotoPresident Trump at the White House on Thursday, the day he disparaged Haitian and African immigrants.Credit Tom Brenner/The New York TimesMr. Trump’s remarks were “sadly reminiscent of the language used by nativists and racists in the early 20th century against Eastern and Southern Europeans and Asians,” said Mae Ngai, an immigration historian at Columbia University.“Obviously he likes Norwegians because they are white,” she added. “But he knows nothing about Norway, a country with single-payer universal health care and free college education. Why would anyone want to leave Norway for the U.S.?”The more liberal immigration policies of 1965 still form the scaffolding of the United States’ legal immigration system, ushering in — if unintentionally — an America that grows less white every year. For years now, Asians, Africans and Hispanics have accounted for an expanding proportion of the country’s visas.But first came 1924, when the people in charge spoke openly of ranking immigrants of certain origins above others.That was the year Congress passed an immigration overhaul that set strict quotas designed to encourage immigrants from Western Europe, block all but a few from Southern and Eastern Europe and bar altogether those from Asia. Overall immigration levels were slashed. The racial theories at play in the legislation, wrote the immigration historian Roger Daniels, would later become the first draft of “the official ideology of Nazi Germany.”There were some familiar refrains in the 1924 immigration debate. Cheap immigrant labor had depressed wages, the restrictionists said. Immigrants had seized jobs from Americans, they said. But it was also heavy on racist rhetoric aimed at preserving what eugenicists and social theorists of the time called the “Nordic” race that, in their telling, had originally settled the United States.Newsletter Sign UpContinue reading the main storySign Up for the Race/Related NewsletterJoin a deep and provocative exploration of race with a diverse group of New York Times journalists.Thank you for subscribing.An error has occurred. […]

Editorial: Donald Trump Flushes Away America’s Reputation

Mr. Trump denied making the remarks on Friday, but Senator Richard Durbin, Democrat of Illinois, who attended the meeting, said the president did in fact say these “hate-filled things, and he said them repeatedly.”Newsletter Sign UpContinue reading the main storySign Up for the Opinion Today NewsletterEvery weekday, get thought-provoking commentary from Op-Ed columnists, the Times editorial board and contributing writers from around the world.Thank you for subscribing.An error has occurred. Please try again later.You are already subscribed to this email.View all New York Times newsletters.Of course he did […]