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Europe Edition: Ireland, Catalonia, F.B.I.: Your Tuesday Briefing

#briefing-market-module.interactive-embedded .interactive-caption { display: none; } Market Snapshot View Full Overview In the News Photo Credit Strava • Security analysts say the Strava fitness app, which shares maps of users’ exercise activities, has unwittingly revealed the locations of U.S. and European military bases. Above, user data in Berlin. [The New York Times] • In Britain, Conservative critics of Prime Minister Theresa May are increasingly voicing concerns that she is pursuing what they call “Brino,” or Brexit in Name Only. [The New York Times] • Romania’s Parliament confirmed Viorica Dancila as the country’s first female prime minister. Critics fear that efforts to curb anticorruption legislation will continue. [The New York Times] Continue reading the main story • The Trump administration declined to apply new sanctions on Russia under a law that is meant to punish Moscow for election-meddling. [The New York Times] • In our Op-Ed pages, a Kurdish commander in Afrin, Syria, asks the U.S. […]

Nonfiction: What Trump Can Learn From a Gold Star Family

Khan had had enough. A Pakistani-born and Harvard-trained lawyer, a Muslim, but, most important, a patriotic, naturalized American citizen, Khizr Khan revered the Constitution. He came to Philadelphia to teach Donald Trump a lesson […]

In Monument Debate, Calls for an Overdue Reckoning on Race and Southern Identity

Starting in the early 2010s, a growing number of young, openly white nationalist Southerners began joining Southern nationalist organizations, primarily the Alabama-based League of the South. Mr. Griffin, an Auburn University graduate who had become radicalized by books and in online forums that had little to do with the Confederacy, was among them.These men dismissed those making a racially friendly case for the Confederacy — “rainbow confederates,” as Mr. Griffin disparagingly calls them — in favor of an unapologetic embrace of the South’s white supremacist past. “Let’s be frank,” said Matthew Heimbach, a former member of the League of the South who went on to co-found the white nationalist Traditionalist Worker Party. […]

They’re Building a Trump-Centric Movement. But Don’t Call It Trumpism.

In its inaugural issue last summer, the journal published “Our Declaration of Independence From the Conservative Movement,” which argued that what worked for Ronald Reagan could no longer define the movement.“We cannot slavishly attempt to relive the politics of 40 years ago,” the editors wrote.These disillusioned academics see plenty of things they like in the Trump administration, including Mr. Trump’s withdrawal from the Paris climate accord and his proposal to reduce legal immigration by half within a decade. And though Republicans have failed so far to dismantle the Affordable Care Act, they don’t blame the president, whom they applaud for at least trying to undo what they see as an unconstitutional expansion of government power.But in this view, Mr. Trump is not so much a movement leader as he is a vessel. “We see a lot of potential here with this particular administration,” Mr. Boychuk said, “but we’re not going to live or die by him.”If nothing else, these conservatives see Mr. Trump as a disrupter who is already jolting a movement they believe is badly ossified and reflexively devoted to an agenda of corporate tax cuts, global trade agreements and military adventurism — “checklist conservatism,” as an essay by Chris Buskirk, the publisher of American Greatness, described it.They accept the almost socialist-sounding “pro-worker” label. They believe the Republican Party has been far too complicit in the expansion of the federal bureaucracy, what they scorn as the “administrative state.” And they tend to de-emphasize social issues as a priority.“When they started saying Trump wasn’t a conservative was when I started paying attention,” said Julie Ponzi, who helps edit American Greatness from her house in Glendora, a small community about 20 miles east of Los Angeles at the foot of the San Gabriel Mountains.“What’s the problem?” she insisted, referring to Mr. […]

Common Sense: What Would It Take for Trump to Get His Corporate Tax Wish?

After last week’s collapse of health care legislation, many believe Republicans can’t afford to fail again, especially on what is widely considered their signature issue: taxes. As Scott A. Hodge, president of the conservative-leaning Tax Foundation, told me this week: “If the Republicans fail with tax reform, it would be truly catastrophic. It’s really all or nothing at this point.”There’s only one major stumbling block to a 15 percent rate, and the conventional wisdom is that it’s an intractable one: how to pay for it.According to estimates by the Tax Foundation, a cut in the corporate rate to 15 percent would add $2.2 trillion to the deficit over 10 years on a “static” basis, which assumes no additional economic growth. After factoring in growth and higher resulting tax receipts, known as “dynamic” scoring, the deficit would grow by $1 trillion, according to the foundation.And if rates also go to 15 percent for pass-through entities — businesses that pay taxes at individual rates, like limited-liability corporations and partnerships — that adds another $1.5 trillion on a static basis, and $1.3 trillion on a dynamic basis, the foundation estimates. (A cut in pass-through rates has much less impact under dynamic scoring, because individuals and small businesses spend far less on capital projects and thus do less to stimulate the economy.)Paying for corporate tax cuts of that magnitude “is a tremendous challenge if you don’t want to blow a hole in the deficit,” Mr. Hodge said. “Anyone writing tax legislation will find that the options are very limited.”How big is the challenge? In their tax blueprint, House Republicans could only get the corporate rate to 20 percent. […]

Julie Payette, engineer, scientist and astronaut, to become Governor General of Canada

Because we all need role models and she is the living embodiment of the term. […]

Filmmaker Rob Stewart fought to protect sharks, and now we must continue his work

Lush Cosmetics and Humane Society International support the important ocean conservation work pioneered by 37-year-old creator of ‘Sharkwater’ who died suddenly this past January. […]