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  • Tricks Any Dog Can Do! - Susan Day September 21, 2017
    This great book comes with advice and guidance as to the best way to teach these tricks. It offers more than one method which the reader can choose depending upon their own situation. There is also advice to using treats and shows you how to not end up with a treat junkie! This books is from the desk of Susan Day, a canine behaviourist. Susan teaches obedien […]
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  • La teoría del todo - Stephen W. Hawking September 21, 2017
    Una manera clara y amena de acercarse a los misterios del universo. En esta esclarecedora obra, el gran físico británico Stephen Hawking nos ofrece una historia del universo, del big bang a los agujeros negros. En siete pasos, Hawking logra explicar la historia del universo, desde las primeras teorías del mundo griego y de la época medieval hasta las más com […]
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  • La física del futuro - Michio Kaku September 21, 2017
    Un recorrido asombroso a través de los próximos cien años de revolución científica. El futuro ya se está inventando en los laboratorios de los científicos más punteros de todo el mundo. Con toda probabilidad, en 2100 controlaremos los ordenadores a través de diminutos sensores cerebrales y podremos mover objetos con el poder de nuestras mentes, la inteligenc […]
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  • EnCambio - Estanislao Bachrach September 21, 2017
    EnCambio te va a permitir alumbrar los procesos por los cuales te comportás de determinada manera con el fin de dejar atrás aquellos hábitos y conductas que ya no te sirven. El objetivo es que aprendas del potencial que tiene tu cerebro para cambiar y la capacidad que tenés vos para modificarlo. Este año cambio de trabajo, empiezo el gimnasio, bajo esos kili […]
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  • El gran diseño - Stephen Hawking & Leonard Mlodinow September 21, 2017
    Aun antes de aparecer, este libro ha venido precedido, en todos los medios de comunicación, de una extraordinaria polémica sobre  sus conclusiones: que tanto nuestro universo como los otros muchos universos posibles surgieron de la nada, porque su creación no requiere de la intervención de ningún Dios o ser sobrenatural, sino que todos los universos pro […]
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  • ¿Cómo pensar como Sherlock Holmes? - Maria Konnikova September 21, 2017
    Ningún personaje de ficción es más conocido por sus poderes de intuición y observación que Sherlock Holmes. Pero, ¿es su inteligencia extraordinaria una invención de la ficción o podemos aprender a desarrollar estas habilidades, para mejorar nuestras vidas en el trabajo y en casa? A través de ¿ Cómo pensar como Sherlock Holmes? , la periodista y psicóloga Ma […]
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  • Ágilmente - Estanislao Bachrach September 21, 2017
    Bachrach es Doctor en biología molecular y explica el funcionamiento del cerebro. A través de ello, da consejos y herramientas para ser más creativos y felices en el trabajo y en la vida. La neurociencia es clara: el cerebro aprende hasta el último día de vida. La creatividad puede expandirse. Tu mente, mediante la aplicación de las técnicas correctas, puede […]
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  • Sobre la teoría de la relatividad especial y general - Albert Einstein September 21, 2017
    Entre el Electromagnetismo y la Mecánica newtoniana existe una fórmula de bisagra: la teoría de la relatividad especial y general. La importancia del nuevo marco planteado por Albert Einstein se entiende por lo siguiente: la percepción del tiempo y el espacio es relativa al observador. ¿Qué significa esto? Si usted viaja a una velocidad mayor que la de la lu […]
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  • Breve historia de mi vida - Stephen Hawking September 21, 2017
    La mente maravillosa de Stephen Hawking ha deslumbrado al mundo entero revelando los misterios del universo. Ahora, por primera vez, el cosmólogo más brillante de nuestra era explora, con una mirada reveladora, su propia vida y evolución intelectual. Breve historia de mi vida cuenta el sorprendente viaje de Stephen Hawking desde su niñez […]
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  • Física General Esencial - Agustín Vázquez Sánchez September 21, 2017
    La nueva edición del ebook contiene ahora ocho temas completos de física y una sección de prácticas para realizar en casa. Se han corregido errores y agregado más ejemplos y ejercicios además de recursos multimedia en todos los capítulos.  Los ejemplos resueltos se presentan paso a paso a través de una solución algebraica con lo cual se evitan errores n […]
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Amid Opioid Crisis, Insurers Restrict Pricey, Less Addictive Painkillers

ProPublica and The New York Times analyzed Medicare prescription drug plans covering 35.7 million people in the second quarter of this year. Only one-third of the people covered, for example, had any access to Butrans, a painkilling skin patch that contains a less-risky opioid, buprenorphine. And every drug plan that covered lidocaine patches, which are not addictive but cost more than other generic pain drugs, required that patients get prior approval for them.Have You Had Difficulty Paying For or Obtaining Prescriptions?The New York Times would like to hear from people about their experiences paying for prescription drugs.In contrast, almost every plan covered common opioids and very few required any prior approval.The insurers have also erected more hurdles to approving addiction treatments than for the addictive substances themselves, the analysis found.Alisa Erkes lives with stabbing pain in her abdomen that, for more than two years, was made tolerable by Butrans. But in January, her insurer, UnitedHealthcare, stopped covering the drug, which had cost the company $342 for a four-week supply. After unsuccessfully appealing the denial, Ms. Erkes and her doctor scrambled to find a replacement that would quiet her excruciating stomach pains. They eventually settled on long-acting morphine, a cheaper opioid that UnitedHealthcare covered with no questions asked. It costs her and her insurer a total of $29 for a month’s supply.Continue reading the main storyThe Drug Enforcement Administration places morphine in a higher category than Butrans for risk of abuse and dependence […]

‘Unboxing’ videos distract from the real problem of packaging waste

What happens to the plastic, ribbon, cardboard, and glitter after the two-minute show is over? […]

You can thank antibiotics for all the cheap meat

Farmers pump livestock full of drugs to keep them ‘healthy’ and fatten them up quickly. Unfortunately this could be a global death sentence. […]

Priority pathogens list published by WHO

“If we leave it to market forces alone, the new antibiotics we most urgently need are not going to be developed in time” […]

California’s Marijuana Legalization Faces An Unlikely Foe: Growers

(HUMBOLDT COUNTY, Calif.) — Hezekiah Allen is a third-generation marijuana farmer in this Northern California county, where the cool coastal fog pours off the Pacific Ocean, coaxing pot plants to heights of 20 feet. The executive director of the California Growers Association trade group, Allen has long sought an end to what he calls “prohibition” and has looked forward to a day when he and the thousands of pot farmers here would no longer be outlaws. But he said he can’t bring himself to vote for Proposition 64, a referendum on California’s November ballot that would legalize cultivation, sale and recreational use of marijuana. While pot purveyors might seem to be likely Prop. 64 supporters, Allen’s ambivalence is widespread within the industry. The California Growers Association took a neutral stance after a recent poll among its 750 farmers, distributors and retailers found a split: 31 percent supported, 31 percent opposed, and 38 percent were undecided. The larger Prop. 64 debate has focused on moral, social and health consequences of legalized pot use, but growers’ concerns are more prosaic. Some fear going legit will mean too much red tape and burdensome oversight. Some fear an onslaught of big business – and competition that could wipe them out. “I don’t want to replace a criminal injustice with an economic injustice,” Allen said. Steve Dodge, the CEO of the Humboldt Growers Collective, another trade group, said he is voting against the initiative because it would allow regulatory inspections that some pot growers view as tantamount to warrantless searches. “We are asking farmers to come out from behind the curtain, but not providing the assurances they need,” he said. “This law is setting the state up for failure.” California, the sixth-largest economy in the world, already has legalized marijuana for medical use. It is the biggest producer in a U.S. market that includes 24 other states and the District of Columbia with some form of legalization. Brokerage Cowen pegs legal and illegal U.S. market at about $30 billion. The approval of recreational use on such a big scale would be a turning point. It would more than double sales in California to $6.46 billion in 2020 from the $2.76 billion in medical use receipts last year, according to a projection by market researcher New Frontier. Polls suggest the measures will pass. But growers’ concerns show it won’t be easy to move a multi-billion-dollar gray industry into the light. Growers would face tax bills and the expense of improving their farms’ ecological footprints to meet environmental regulations. And, after a five year grace period, industrial-sized farms would be allowed, a prospect that is expected to attract corporate agriculture. Some growers believe going legit would be less lucrative than selling to states where marijuana remains illegal, a calculus that could drive them further underground. “Outlaw, not criminal” Six hours north of San Francisco, old growth forests in what is known as the “Emerald Triangle” nurture vast marijuana production. Thousand-year-old redwoods have sheltered growers from raids by authorities since the collapse of logging here in the 60s and 70s gave rise to the illicit industry. Wearing a sweatshirt bearing a pot leaf and the slogan, “I’m an outlaw, not a criminal,” a black market grower tended to small plants bursting with buds raised in a room under high powered lights and the breeze of fans. The grower, who identified himself only as Jason B for fear of prosecution, said he wants to keep big business “out of our neighborhood.” “The reason I will vote ‘no’ on the proposition is that it will be corporate influenced and it would be a subpar product,” he said. Standing in his outdoor grove of plants that tower above him, Stephen Dillon said the Humboldt Sun Growers Guild he heads is split over Prop. 64. Growers in the group also are concerned that it will open the industry to big agriculture, as well as taxes and penalties, he said. Dillon acknowledged some illegal growers hurt the environment, draining creeks for irrigation, pouring pesticide-laden runoff back into the water supply and creating mountains of trash on their sites. Prop. 64 would allow the state to revoke the licenses of such bad actors. But Dillon said its environmental regulations could cost $20,000 to $100,000 per farm to meet. Doubts in Haight-Ashbury Doubts are not confined to growers. Patrice Scott is a receptionist for Green Evaluations, a medical marijuana clinic above Amoeba Records in San Francisco’s historic Haight-Ashbury district, the epicenter of the hippie movement in the late 1960s that promoted free love, psychedelic music and pot. Scott said she will vote against Prop. 64, viewing it as a money grab by state and local governments she fears will squander the revenue. She said the medical marijuana rules, which require purchasers to obtain a card from a physician, work fine. “No one has a problem getting a card,” she said. “This is just a way for them (government) to profit.” But opposition is not universal in the industry. Some, noting a glut in pot is driving down prices, said they welcome legalization if it brings new demand. “It is just free falling,” said Marion Collamar, a Humboldt county grower who supports Prop. 64. The average price of a pound of wholesale cannabis has fallen from $2,030 in January 2016 to $1,664 in August, according to Cannabis Benchmarks, a wholesale cannabis pricing company. Chrystal Ortiz, a small farmer and operations manager for the Sun Growers Guild, said she supports Prop 64 because it would eliminate or reduce most criminal penalties, as well as prior convictions, for marijuana offenses. “Primarily black and brown underprivileged people are the ones being affected by the illegality of cannabis,” she said. (Reporting by Rory Carroll; Editing by Peter Henderson and Lisa Girion) […]

Scientists Tell Time Magazine Their Marijuana Research Goals

by Rick Thompson In the wake of the DEA’s refusal to move cannabis from the list of the most addictive and non-medical drugs,TIME Magazine sought opinions on the future of canna-science from experts currently conducting research with marijuana. The casual statements about the safety of cannabis made by the experts are noteworthy. Scientists argue that […]

Bud Summit To Benefit Veterans and Student Policy Group

WASHINGTON – The organizers of the Business, Understanding, Development Summit (BUD Summit) announced today it would donate a portion of the proceeds from its event to the Weed for Warriors Project and Students for Sensible Drug Policy. “From the start, the BUD Summit has set the goal of sharing revenue with organizations that represent the […]