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Florida manatees can survive for at least another century

In great news for manatees, researchers predict that the gentle ‘sea cows’ will endure for at least another 100 years as long as threats continue to be managed. […]

Scientists Agree: It’s Time To End The War On Wildlife

Killing large predators to reduce livestock conflicts or benefit game populations has long been thought to be ineffective — and devastating for ecosystems — and a growing body of scientific literature criticizing the widespread practice is confirming those fears. Most recently, this month, the Journal of Mammalogy — a highly respected international scientific journal and flagship publication for the American Society of Mammalogists — published a special collection of articles criticizing lethal control of predators such as wolves and grizzlies. Today’s predator control is widespread in the American West and has its origins in barbaric 20th century, government-sponsored predator eradication programs. Those utilized poisons and bounties to drive grizzly bears and wolves to the brink of extinction. Thanks to the protection of the Endangered Species Act — which has saved more than 99 percent of the plants and animals under its protection and put hundreds on the road to recovery — the grizzly bear and wolf have begun to recover. But as these large carnivores expand their population size and range, people have once again called for lethal control to address livestock depredations and inflate game populations. In states where gray wolves have lost their federal protections, such as Idaho, state managers dead set on killing the predators established aggressive hunting seasons and lethal depredation controls. After the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed removing Yellowstone grizzly bears from the list of federally protected species, states like Montana moved quickly to establish hunting seasons.Then there’s the coyote, a predator lacking protection at state or federal levels and a primary target of predator control programs across the U.S. Tens of thousands of these resilient predators are killed each year by a highly secretive arm of the U.S. […]

Trump delays listing bumblebee as an endangered species

Protection for the beleaguered rusty patched bumblebee was set to begin on February 10. […]

It’s Time To Stop Shortchanging Endangered Species

Endangered species recovery efforts are being dangerously shortchanged, and with a Trump administration and Republican-controlled Congress holding the reins, many of the most imperiled creatures could be pushed to the edge of extinction – or over it. My colleagues and I at the Center for Biological Diversity recently released a first-of-its-kind analysis that found the amount of money the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service receives to recover endangered species – from birds and fish to plants and mammals – is just 3.5 percent of what is needed. That number is frighteningly low, and it is unacceptable. Indeed, roughly one out of every four endangered species received less than $10,000 in 2014, the last year that data is available, and 43 species received less than $1,000 […]

Lash Out At The Darkness And Fight Like Hell

Since Tuesday night, I can only think about one thing: stopping Donald Trump from destroying the planet. If President Trump carries out the disastrous promises he made while campaigning, the Environmental Protection Agency will be gutted, the Endangered Species Act will be repealed, old-growth forests will be clearcut, hard-fought global climate change agreements will be undermined, and polluters will be given free rein over our water and air. […]

Tackling the International Wildlife Trade Head-On

The first week of meetings for the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) has just concluded–and there has been pleasant progress so far! Straight away, Committee I tackled the global problem of trade in pangolins, about which I’ve written before […]

Galapagos Islands getting major renewable energy expansion

The current wind power installation has replaced millions of liters of diesel fuel and helped protect the islands endangered animals. […]