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Another Shooting, Another Gun Debate. Will the Outcome Be the Same?

By evening, one anti-gun group had mobilized and already sent out its first email: “RESOURCES + EXPERTS AVAILABLE: Florida High School Shooting.” Another group, Everytown for Gun Safety, founded and financed by Michael Bloomberg, the billionaire former New York mayor, activated the 1,500 members of its “survivors network,” and soon paid $230,000 for an advertisement in The New York Times shaming pro-gun lawmakers.The National Rifle Association followed its own playbook: remaining silent for several days — a recognition that its message might be unwelcome during the initial burst of grief. But it used its NRATV channel to argue to its members that more guns in schools could prevent massacres. Sales of so-called bump stocks, which can make a semiautomatic weapon fire like an automatic, rose out of fear that they would be banned.The battles waged after shootings in Newtown, Conn.; Orlando, Fla.; Las Vegas; and Sutherland Springs, Tex., began playing out all over, presumably heading toward the same stalemate.But this time, a few things are different: The gun control side has developed a well-financed infrastructure that did not exist when Mr. Barden’s son Daniel and other schoolchildren were fatally shot at Sandy Hook. Within days of the Parkland shooting, one anti-gun group flooded Florida lawmakers with 2,500 calls and 1,700 emails opposing a bill allowing guns in schools.Another difference is an unpredictable president who belongs to the National Rifle Association and promotes the N.R.A.-favored solution of arming trained teachers but has also embraced a couple of modest gun control measures opposed by gun rights groups.And perhaps most dramatically, the We-Call-B.S. teenagers of Florida have injected a passionate new energy into a stale debate, organizing demonstrations, flooding the Statehouse in Tallahassee, composing songs, creating protest signs, confronting politicians and taking to TV airwaves with an intensity and composure and power rarely seen in recent years.“The initial reaction was the same kind of sickened resignation — this is one of the worst ever, and this probably won’t be enough either,” said Matt Bennett, a founder of Third Way, a center-left advocacy group in Washington.PhotoWayne LaPierre, the chief of the National Rifle Association, criticized Democrats on Thursday for calling for more gun control laws.Credit Pete Marovich for The New York Times“What has changed since then is the kids and the extraordinary, galvanizing force they have become,” he added, interrupting an interview to take a call from his 17-year-old son, whose class was leaving school to march to the White House. “No one knows when we are going to hit a tipping point on this issue […]

Marco Rubio and an N.R.A. Official Were Jeered and Lectured on Gun Control

President Trump and Gov. Rick Scott of Florida, a Republican, both declined invitations to participate in the town hall-style meeting.The father of a 14-year-old girl who was killed at Stoneman Douglas angrily lectured Mr. Rubio for his refusal to support gun control legislation.The father, Fred Guttenberg, demanded that Mr. Rubio explain his opposition to a ban on the kind of assault weapon that the gunman at the school used to shoot his daughter, Jaime.“My daughter, running down the hallway, was shot in the back with an assault weapon, the weapon of choice,” Mr. Guttenberg said during the forum as Mr. Rubio stood stone-faced. “It is too easy to get. It is a weapon of war. The fact that you can’t stand with everybody else in this room and say that, I’m sorry.”The room erupted in applause for Mr. […]

New York Today: New York Today: Our City’s Rosa Parks

Weather.init(); }()); You knew it wouldn’t last. Our balmy weather is gone. Today will be cold, gray and wet. Expect rain, mostly after 9 a.m., and temperatures to fall to 39 by sunset. In the News • As the temperature hit a record high by noon, the Bryant Park ice skating rink in Midtown was covered in puddles, but skaters were undeterred. [New York Times] Photo The temperature reached 78 degrees in Manhattan. Credit Julia Gillard for The New York Times • A federal judge rejected bail for the former charter schoolteacher who was arrested last week for what the authorities called a bomb-making effort with his twin brother. [New York Times] • Seventeen people were indicted in a scheme to dominate the city’s towing industry, which prosecutors said defrauded insurers out of millions of dollars. [New York Times] • Representative Claudia Tenney, a Republican from Central New York, is being criticized after remarking that many mass murderers “end up being Democrats.” [New York Times] Continue reading the main story • JPMorgan Chase announced that it planned to tear down its Park Avenue headquarters and build a bigger, sleeker building in an effort to take advantage of new zoning laws. […]

Marco Rubio, Ivanka Trump, Ice Hockey: Your Thursday Briefing

#briefing-market-module.interactive-embedded .interactive-caption { display: none; } Market Snapshot View Full Overview Smarter Living Tips, both new and old, for a more fulfilling life. Continue reading the main story • “Natural” sounds great on a food label, but it doesn’t always mean what you think. • Want to get away? Here are 10 affordable European trips. • Recipe of the day: Pasta with bacon, cheese, lemon and pine nuts satisfies many tastes. Noteworthy • Americans win hockey gold The U.S. women beat Canada today in a shootout, 3-2, to capture their first Olympic gold in ice hockey in 20 years. The two countries have dominated the event since women’s hockey was introduced at the Games in 1998. On the slopes, Mikaela Shiffrin won silver in the Alpine combined event; Lindsey Vonn finished without a medal. […]

Europe Edition: Syria, Poland, Winter Olympics: Your Wednesday Briefing

#briefing-market-module.interactive-embedded .interactive-caption { display: none; } Market Snapshot View Full Overview In the News Photo Credit Jason Szenes/European Pressphoto Agency • The Palestinian president, Mahmoud Abbas, addressed the U.N. […]

Florida, Special Counsel, Syria: Your Tuesday Evening Briefing

#briefing-market-module.interactive-embedded .interactive-caption { display: none; } Market Snapshot View Full Overview ____ Photo Credit Meridith Kohut for The New York Times 10. Finally, a vast swath of Patagonia — home to pumas, condors, flamingos and endangered deer species — is getting new protections. Continue reading the main story President Michelle Bachelet of Chile recently announced the creation of a 10-million-acre national park system stretching all the way south to Cape Horn, where the tip of South America splinters into fjords and canals. It’s the brainchild of Kristine McDivitt Tompkins and her husband, Douglas Tompkins, who founded The North Face and Esprit clothing companies. They had paid $345 million — much of their fortune — to buy so much land that some Chileans became worried about national security. Please enjoy the view. ____ Newsletter Sign UpContinue reading the main storyThe Evening Briefing by EmailGet a nightly rundown of the day’s top stories, delivered to your inbox every Monday through Friday.Thank you for subscribing.An error has occurred. Please try again later.You are already subscribed to this email.View all New York Times newsletters […]

New York Today: New York Today: Albany Agenda

Weather.init(); }()); Warm and foggy. What kind of February weather is that? The record for this date is 69 degrees. We will come close, with a high of 65. […]