DreamHost

TARGET: Save with the Red Card!

Subscribe

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Green Apps

ITUNES TV AND MOVIES

Categories

Burpee Gardening

Whole House Water Filter

PINGO

Soft Phone Banner

RE USE IT!

ReUseIt.com

Natural Mosquito Control

10% Off Mosquito Magnet Accessories - Use Code MMACCTEN

FTC Disclosure

Green Reflection may receive remuneration from the advertisers on this site.

In Trump’s Immigration Remarks, Echoes of a Century-Old Racial Ranking

Its resurfacing in the public sphere capsizes a half-century of mainstream consensus: that immigrants enrich the United States, no matter where they come from.PhotoPresident Trump at the White House on Thursday, the day he disparaged Haitian and African immigrants.Credit Tom Brenner/The New York TimesMr. Trump’s remarks were “sadly reminiscent of the language used by nativists and racists in the early 20th century against Eastern and Southern Europeans and Asians,” said Mae Ngai, an immigration historian at Columbia University.“Obviously he likes Norwegians because they are white,” she added. “But he knows nothing about Norway, a country with single-payer universal health care and free college education. Why would anyone want to leave Norway for the U.S.?”The more liberal immigration policies of 1965 still form the scaffolding of the United States’ legal immigration system, ushering in — if unintentionally — an America that grows less white every year. For years now, Asians, Africans and Hispanics have accounted for an expanding proportion of the country’s visas.But first came 1924, when the people in charge spoke openly of ranking immigrants of certain origins above others.That was the year Congress passed an immigration overhaul that set strict quotas designed to encourage immigrants from Western Europe, block all but a few from Southern and Eastern Europe and bar altogether those from Asia. Overall immigration levels were slashed. The racial theories at play in the legislation, wrote the immigration historian Roger Daniels, would later become the first draft of “the official ideology of Nazi Germany.”There were some familiar refrains in the 1924 immigration debate. Cheap immigrant labor had depressed wages, the restrictionists said. Immigrants had seized jobs from Americans, they said. But it was also heavy on racist rhetoric aimed at preserving what eugenicists and social theorists of the time called the “Nordic” race that, in their telling, had originally settled the United States.Newsletter Sign UpContinue reading the main storySign Up for the Race/Related NewsletterJoin a deep and provocative exploration of race with a diverse group of New York Times journalists.Thank you for subscribing.An error has occurred. […]

In a Complex Tax Bill, Let the Hunt for Loopholes Begin

NYT

View original post here: In a Complex Tax Bill, Let the Hunt for Loopholes Begin

After a Chaotic Start, Congress Has Made a Conservative Mark

NYT

See more here: After a Chaotic Start, Congress Has Made a Conservative Mark

State of the Art: What the Tax Bill Fails to Address: Technology’s Tsunami

NYT

View original here: State of the Art: What the Tax Bill Fails to Address: Technology’s Tsunami

G.O.P. Finally Notches 2017 Victory While Bracing for 2018 Verdict

NYT

Excerpt from: G.O.P. Finally Notches 2017 Victory While Bracing for 2018 Verdict

A Middle-Class Tax Cut? Americans Aren’t Buying It

NYT

Here is the original post: A Middle-Class Tax Cut? Americans Aren’t Buying It

Senators Scramble to Advance Tax Bill That Increasingly Rewards Wealthy

At the heart of the debate is whether to more favorably treat small businesses and other so-called pass-through entities — businesses whose profits are distributed to their owners and taxed at rates for individuals. Seventy percent of pass-through income flows to the top 1 percent of American earners, according to research by Owen Zidar, an economist at the University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business.GraphicWhich Republican Senators Might Oppose the Tax Bill, and WhySenate leaders would need to win over several Republican senators to pass a tax overhaul.OPEN GraphicTwo Republican senators, Ron Johnson of Wisconsin and Steve Daines of Montana, have said that they will vote against the plan if it does not do more to help the owners of those businesses, possibly by increasing the individual income tax deduction for such owners from the 17.4 percent rate currently in the Senate bill.Republicans, who control the Senate 52 to 48, can afford to lose only two of their members if they hope to pass the bill on party lines in the upper chamber.Mr. […]