DreamHost

TARGET: Save with the Red Card!

Subscribe

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Green Apps

ITUNES TV AND MOVIES

Categories

Burpee Gardening

Whole House Water Filter

PINGO

Soft Phone Banner

RE USE IT!

ReUseIt.com

Natural Mosquito Control

10% Off Mosquito Magnet Accessories - Use Code MMACCTEN

FTC Disclosure

Green Reflection may receive remuneration from the advertisers on this site.

What’s in the Tax Bill, and How It Will Affect You

NEW PLAN The standard deduction is temporarily increased to $12,000 for singles and $24,000 for married couples filing joint returns.The child tax credit is increased to $2,000 for each child — and up to $1,400 of that can be delivered in the form of refundable credit, which means taxpayers can receive money back even if they have no tax liability. (Taxpayers may also reduce their tax bill by up to $500 for other dependents who are not children.)But that all changes in 2025, when the deductions and exemptions revert to current law.Mortgage Interest, and State and Local Tax DeductionsNOW You can generally deduct the amount you pay for state and local income taxes, including property taxes, on your federal income tax return. You can also deduct the interest you pay each year on mortgage debt up to $1 million, a cap that can cover multiple homes. Plus, you can generally deduct up to $100,000 in interest you pay on a home-equity loan or line of credit.NEW PLAN Taxpayers may deduct only up to $10,000 total, which may include any combination of state and local taxes, including property taxes (also sales taxes). But don’t try to prepay your state and local income taxes before year-end to circumvent the new limit. The proposal is one step ahead of you and your accountant and won’t allow it.You can also deduct the interest paid on mortgage debt up to $750,000. But if you bought a property before Dec. 15, you can still deduct interest up to $1 million (the limit under current law) […]

Kelly, in Defending Trump Call, Holds Up Military as an Elite Class

Although he has rarely spoken about his son’s death publicly, Mr. Kelly told reporters on Thursday what happened when his friend Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr., now the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff but in late 2010 was the assistant commandant of the Marine Corps, broke the news to Mr. Kelly of his son’s death.PhotoA mother and son mourning at Arlington National Cemetery on Memorial Day this year.Credit Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images“He said, ‘Kel, he was doing exactly what he wanted to do when he was killed,’” Mr. Kelly recalled. “He knew what he was getting into by joining that 1 percent. He knew what the possibilities were because we’re at war.”Mr. Kelly used General Dunford’s words to try to explain why Mr […]

Live Briefing: Las Vegas Shooting: Investigators Seek Gunman’s Motive

A federal law enforcement official earlier said two rifles were outfitted with scopes and set up on tripods in front of two big windows. Another official said that among the weapons were AR-15-style assault rifles. Both officials spoke on the condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to divulge details of the investigation.Sheriff Lombardo said that Mr. Paddock brought at least 10 suitcases into his hotel room over a period of time.The sheriff said that Mr. Paddock fired through his hotel room door at security guards, striking one in the leg. […]

Johns Hopkins sets record for drone blood delivery flight

The new study shows that drones can handle longer aid delivery trips than previously thought. […]

Live Briefing: Harvey Brings Catastrophic Floods to Houston; at Least Five Reported Dead

“Where?” the sheriff responded on Twitter. “Keep calling 911.” — JULIE TURKEWITZ in HoustonSome hospitals are protected, but patients can’t get there.William McKeon, president and chief executive of the Texas Medical Center in Houston, said the flood control systems in the massive hospital complex had been activated. “Those submarine doors were locked yesterday afternoon when we started to see the rain,” he said.Continue reading the main storyPatients, however, were having difficulty reaching medical care. “Many outlying streets that are the channels to get to the medical center are flooded,” Mr. […]

The fatty repercussions of free trade

A thought-provoking study suggests that NAFTA’s reducing the cost of high-fructose corn syrup has contributed to Canada’s rising obesity problem. […]

Senate Health Care Bill Includes Deep Cuts to Medicaid

More moderate Republican senators, such as Dean Heller of Nevada, expressed their own qualms, as did the American Hospital Association, the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network and the Association of American Medical Colleges.VideoHow the G.O.P. Health Bill Would Change MedicaidThe reporter Margot Sanger-Katz examines how the Republican health plan aims to roll back a program that insures nearly one in five Americans.By MARGOT SANGER-KATZ, ROBIN STEIN and SARAH STEIN KERR on Publish Date June 22, 2017.Photo by Doug Mills/The New York Times.Watch in Times Video »embed “We are extremely disappointed by the Senate bill released today,” the medical school association wrote. “Despite promises to the contrary, it will leave millions of people without health coverage, and others with only bare bones plans that will be insufficient to properly address their needs.”Once promised as a top-to-bottom revamp of the health bill passed by the House last month, the Senate bill instead maintains its structure, with modest adjustments. The Senate version is, in some respects, more moderate than the House bill, offering more financial assistance to some lower-income people to help them defray the rapidly rising cost of private health insurance.Continue reading the main storyBut the Senate bill would make subsidies less generous than under current law. It would lower the income limit for receiving subsidies to cover insurance premiums to 350 percent of the poverty level, or about $42,000 for an individual, from 400 percent.Older people could be disproportionately hurt because they pay more for insurance in general. Both chambers’ bills would allow insurers to charge older people five times as much as younger ones; the limit now is three times.The Senate measure, like the House bill, would phase out the extra money that the federal government has provided to states as an incentive to expand eligibility for Medicaid. And like the House measure, it would put the entire Medicaid program on a budget, ending the open-ended entitlement that now exists.It would also repeal most of the tax increases imposed by the Affordable Care Act — a capital gains tax cut for the affluent would be retroactive for this year — to pay for expanded coverage, in effect handing a broad tax cut to the affluent in a measure that would also slice billions of dollars from Medicaid, a health care program that serves one in five Americans, not only the poor but almost two-thirds of people in nursing homes […]