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New York Today: New York Today: Our City’s Rosa Parks

Weather.init(); }()); You knew it wouldn’t last. Our balmy weather is gone. Today will be cold, gray and wet. Expect rain, mostly after 9 a.m., and temperatures to fall to 39 by sunset. In the News • As the temperature hit a record high by noon, the Bryant Park ice skating rink in Midtown was covered in puddles, but skaters were undeterred. [New York Times] Photo The temperature reached 78 degrees in Manhattan. Credit Julia Gillard for The New York Times • A federal judge rejected bail for the former charter schoolteacher who was arrested last week for what the authorities called a bomb-making effort with his twin brother. [New York Times] • Seventeen people were indicted in a scheme to dominate the city’s towing industry, which prosecutors said defrauded insurers out of millions of dollars. [New York Times] • Representative Claudia Tenney, a Republican from Central New York, is being criticized after remarking that many mass murderers “end up being Democrats.” [New York Times] Continue reading the main story • JPMorgan Chase announced that it planned to tear down its Park Avenue headquarters and build a bigger, sleeker building in an effort to take advantage of new zoning laws. […]

Trump Rules: F.D.A. Chief Goes Against the Administration Stereotype

“He doesn’t want to blow up the agency,” said Mark I. Schwartz, a Washington lawyer who worked at the F.D.A. in Republican and Democratic administrations.Dr. Gottlieb has briefed Mr […]

New York Today: New York Today: A Concert in a Crypt

NYT

Read more from the original source: New York Today: New York Today: A Concert in a Crypt

Tax Law Offers a Carrot to Gig Workers. But It May Have Costs.

The provision may also turn out to be a boon for employers who are trying to reduce their payroll costs. Workers hired as contractors, who tend to be cheaper, may be less likely to complain about their status under the new tax law.“Firms currently have a lot of incentives to turn workers into independent contractors,” said Lawrence Katz, a labor economist at Harvard. “This reinforces the current trends.”But it could lead to an erosion of the protections that have long been a cornerstone of full-time work.Formal employment, after all, provides more than just income. Unlike independent contractors, employees have access to unemployment insurance if they lose their jobs and workers’ compensation if they are injured at work. They are protected by workplace anti-discrimination laws and have a federally backed right to form a union.Those protections do not generally apply to contractors. Nor do minimum-wage and overtime laws.“What you’re losing is the safety nets for those workers,” said Catherine Ruckelshaus of the National Employment Law Project, an advocacy group.Traditional full-time jobs also insulate workers against the peaks and troughs in the demand for their services. Consider, for instance, the erratic income of retail or fulfillment-center workers hired in the fall and let go after the holidays.PhotoWorkers like janitors were once typically on the payrolls of large companies, enabling their wages to rise with those of other employees if the business did well. Now, such work is increasingly done by contractors.Credit Lucy Nicholson/ReutersAnd because companies have internal pay scales, the lowest-paid employees tend to make more than they would on the open market.Continue reading the main story“It used to be that companies like G.M […]

New York Today: New York Today: How Trains Helped Create the Holidays

NYT

The rest is here: New York Today: New York Today: How Trains Helped Create the Holidays

Affirmative Action Battle Has a New Focus: Asian-Americans

The case, which is clearly aimed for the Supreme Court, puts Asian-Americans front and center in the latest stage of the affirmative action debate. The issue is whether there has been discrimination against Asian-Americans in the name of creating a diverse student body. The Justice Department, which has signaled that it is looking to investigate “intentional race-based discrimination in college and university admissions,” may well focus on Harvard.The Harvard case asserts that the university’s admissions process amounts to an illegal quota system, in which roughly the same percentage of African-Americans, Hispanics, whites and Asian-Americans have been admitted year after year, despite fluctuations in application rates and qualifications.“It falls afoul of our most basic civil rights principles, and those principles are that your race and your ethnicity should not be something to be used to harm you in life nor help you in life,” said Edward Blum, the president of Students for Fair Admissions, the organization that is suing Harvard.His group, a conservative-leaning nonprofit based in Virginia, has filed similar suits against the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the University of Texas at Austin, asserting that white students are at a disadvantage at those colleges because of their admissions policies.The federal government potentially has the ability to influence university admissions policies by withholding federal funds under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which forbids racial discrimination in programs that receive federal money.In many ways, the system the lawsuit is attacking is one Harvard points to with pride. The university has a long and pioneering history of support for affirmative action, going back at least to when Derek Bok, appointed president of Harvard in 1971, embraced policies that became a national model.The university has extended that ethos to many low-income students, allowing them to attend free. […]

‘I Want This to Get Over’: After Congressional Shooting, Complex Grief for a Gunman’s Widow

To be the spouse, or the parent, or the child of someone who commits a mass shooting is to enter a strange club whose members are envied by no one and reviled by many. Rites of passage include hate mail, death threats and the vicious thoughts that haunt them at night. That they should have seen it coming. That they could have done something. That they are alone.Continue reading the main storyAnd then there is the question of how to mourn. How to dispose of a body that everyone else wants to forget.On Tuesday, Ms. Hodgkinson, 65, received an email at her job at an accountant’s office on Main Street, asking her to identify the body […]