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Donald Trump, Theresa May, North Korea: Your Thursday Briefing

#briefing-market-module.interactive-embedded .interactive-caption { display: none; } Market Snapshot View Full Overview In the News Photo Credit Agence France-Presse — Getty Images • Carrie Grace, the former China editor of the BBC who resigned over unequal pay, told a panel of the British Parliament that the news agency had offered her £100,000 in back pay instead of explaining why she was earning less than male colleagues. [Evening Standard] • The U.S. authorities fined Australia’s Labor Party more than $14,000 for allegedly financing flights and travel expenses for party delegates who volunteered on the Bernie Sanders presidential campaign — a breach of U.S. election rules. [The Guardian] Continue reading the main story • Prime Minister Teresa May’s efforts to promote trade on her visit to China are shadowed by uncertainties about her hold on power and Britain’s withdrawal from the European Union […]

Emboldened Israeli Right Presses Moves to Doom 2-State Solution

But Palestinians and Israeli supporters of a two-state solution said the moves revealed the true colors of the country’s ascendant right wing.“We hope that this vote serves as a reminder for the international community that the Israeli government, with the full support of the U.S. administration, is not interested in a just and lasting peace,” Mahmoud Abbas, president of the Palestinian Authority, said Monday, adding that he would respond by revisiting the authority’s existing agreements with Israel. “Rather, its main goal is the consolidation of an apartheid regime in all of historic Palestine.”Daniel Seidemann, director of Terrestrial Jerusalem, which focuses on the Holy City’s fate in a potential two-state solution, said that “what was winked and nodded about before is now being acknowledged publicly: ‘We have no intent of sharing this land with anybody else except as a barely tolerated minority.’”Mr. Netanyahu has publicly said that he supports a two-state solution even as his government has expanded settlements on the occupied West Bank. […]

Top Russian Official Tried to Broker ‘Backdoor’ Meeting Between Trump and Putin

These contacts were set against the backdrop of a sophisticated effort by Russia to hack Democratic computers, disseminate propaganda and undermine Mrs. Clinton’s candidacy. The latest disclosure about Mr. Torshin, who is a leading figure in Mr. Putin’s party, United Russia, shows the direct involvement of a high-ranking Russian official in the Kremlin’s outreach to the campaign.The overture to the Trump campaign was first reported by CNN. The New York Times confirmed new details, including Mr. […]

Europe Edition: Catalonia, Syria, Emmanuel Macron: Your Friday Briefing

#briefing-market-module.interactive-embedded .interactive-caption { display: none; } Market Snapshot View Full Overview In the News Photo Credit Siegfried Modola/Reuters • In Kenya, deadly protests and an opposition boycott marred the presidential election rerun. Voting was postponed until Saturday in some protest-hit counties. [The New York Times] • In Britain, a senior Conservative Party lawmaker’s letter to universities asking how they teach “Brexit” has ignited an uproar and accusations of McCarthyism. [The New York Times] • The new Dutch government is seeking to fend off challenges from the right by embracing more conservative policies. [The New York Times] • Australia’s High Court has disqualified the deputy prime minister and four senators from Parliament in a ruling over their dual citizenships that could cost the government its parliamentary majority. [The New York Times] • In an Op-Ed, an Italian columnist writes about the state of feminism in Italy. [The New York Times] • Novaya Gazeta, Russia’s most prominent independent news outlet, intends to arm its journalists with guns that fire rubber bullets amid security fears. [Associated Press] • A tiny Swiss company quietly amassed exclusive broadcast rights to the soccer World Cup in much of the Americas. It is now under scrutiny amid a wide-ranging corruption probe. […]

Europe Edition: Catalonia, Syria, Emmanuel Macron: Your Friday Briefing

#briefing-market-module.interactive-embedded .interactive-caption { display: none; } Market Snapshot View Full Overview In the News Photo Credit Siegfried Modola/Reuters • In Kenya, deadly protests and an opposition boycott marred the presidential election rerun. Voting was postponed until Saturday in some protest-hit counties. [The New York Times] • In Britain, a senior Conservative Party lawmaker’s letter to universities asking how they teach “Brexit” has ignited an uproar and accusations of McCarthyism. [The New York Times] • The new Dutch government is seeking to fend off challenges from the right by embracing more conservative policies. [The New York Times] • Australia’s High Court has disqualified the deputy prime minister and four senators from Parliament in a ruling over their dual citizenships that could cost the government its parliamentary majority. [The New York Times] • In an Op-Ed, an Italian columnist writes about the state of feminism in Italy. [The New York Times] • Novaya Gazeta, Russia’s most prominent independent news outlet, intends to arm its journalists with guns that fire rubber bullets amid security fears. [Associated Press] • A tiny Swiss company quietly amassed exclusive broadcast rights to the soccer World Cup in much of the Americas. It is now under scrutiny amid a wide-ranging corruption probe. [The New York Times] • In Bangkok, our correspondent was among the hundreds of thousands of people who lined the streets to witness the funeral procession of King Bhumibol Adulyadej […]

Angela Merkel Makes History in German Vote, but So Does Far Right

She said that she would listen to those who voted for the Alternative for Germany, or AfD, and work to win them back “by solving problems, by taking up their worries, partly also their fears, but above all by good politics.”But her comments seemed to augur a shift to the right and more of an emphasis on controls over borders, migration and security.PhotoChristian Democratic Union supporters celebrating exit polls at the party headquarters in Berlin on Sunday — although the conservative bloc’s share of the votes was sharply down from 2013.Credit Kai Pfaffenbach/ReutersDespite her victory, Ms. Merkel and her conservatives cannot lead alone, making it probable that the chancellor’s political life in her fourth term will be substantially more complicated.The shape and policies of a new governing coalition will involve weeks of painstaking negotiations. Smiling, Ms. Merkel said Sunday night that she hoped to have a new government “by Christmas.”The center-left Social Democrats, Ms. Merkel’s coalition partners for the last four years, ran a poor second to her center-right grouping, and the Social Democrats announced Sunday evening that the party would go into opposition, hoping to rebuild their political profile.But the step would also make sure that the AfD stays on the political sidelines and does not become the country’s official opposition.The Alternative for Germany nonetheless vowed to shake the consensus politics of Germany, and in breaking a postwar taboo by entering Parliament, it already had.Continue reading the main storyAlexander Gauland, one of AfD’s leaders, told party supporters after the results that in Parliament: “We will go after them. We will claim back our country.”To cheers, he said: “We did it. We are in the German Parliament and we will change Germany.”Burkhard Schröder, an AfD member since 2014 from Düsseldorf, was ecstatic […]

News Analysis: U.S. Plan for New Afghan Force Revives Fears of Militia Abuses

The new local force would be under the command of the army, and recruits would go through similar training as regular soldiers. But the new force would serve primarily in local communities, holding areas cleared by the regular army, whose units would take on a primarily offensive role.Afghan officials said the new approach would in fact help rein in an unwieldy array of militias, rather than empower them to commit abuses.The idea surely appeals to American commanders, like Gen. John W. Nicholson, the commander of American and NATO forces in Afghanistan. Military officers want to demonstrate progress to Mr. Trump, who said his “original instinct was to pull out.” He has ruled out a “hasty withdrawal” but insisted that there is no “blank check” for what has become the longest war in United States history.But in interviews, at least four Western officials briefed on the plan expressed doubts that the new force would be much different from the old Afghan Local Police militias, given the violent reality that districts are threatened by the Taliban.“It risks being turned into a dangerous shortcut,” one of them said.In a statement, Human Rights Watch, which has widely documented past abuses by Afghan militias, called on the Afghan government to reject the proposal for another force with inadequate training and oversight.“The Afghan government’s expansion of irregular forces could have enormously dangerous consequences for civilians,” said Patricia Gossman, a senior researcher at Human Rights Watch. “Instead of creating additional local forces, which are hard to control and prone to abuses, the Afghan government, with U.S. and NATO support, should be strengthening training and oversight to ensure that all forces respect the law.”Over 16 years, the United States has bankrolled a handful of militias, hoping that each of the latest would improve on the previous one’s history of abuses.Continue reading the main storyThe Afghan Local Police, or A.L.P., began in 2010 as a 10,000-strong force but now stands at more than 20,000 members […]