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Editorial: Donald Trump Flushes Away America’s Reputation

Mr. Trump denied making the remarks on Friday, but Senator Richard Durbin, Democrat of Illinois, who attended the meeting, said the president did in fact say these “hate-filled things, and he said them repeatedly.”Newsletter Sign UpContinue reading the main storySign Up for the Opinion Today NewsletterEvery weekday, get thought-provoking commentary from Op-Ed columnists, the Times editorial board and contributing writers from around the world.Thank you for subscribing.An error has occurred. Please try again later.You are already subscribed to this email.View all New York Times newsletters.Of course he did […]

Asia and Australia Edition: Iran, North Korea, New Year: Your Tuesday Briefing

#briefing-market-module.interactive-embedded .interactive-caption { display: none; } Market Snapshot View Full Overview In the News Photo Credit Alex Hofford/European Pressphoto Agency • In Hong Kong, a pro-democracy march ended in a standoff with the police. Organizers said 10,000 demonstrators were on hand; the police put the number at 6,200. [South China Morning Post] Continue reading the main story • In Afghanistan, a suicide bomber attacked a funeral on Sunday for a local official, killing at least 17 people. [The New York Times] • “No more.” President Donald Trump said the U.S. “foolishly” gave Pakistan more than $33 billion over the last 15 years while getting nothing in return. He pledged to end the economic aid. [Reuters] • Nepal barred solo mountain climbers, including on Mount Everest, in an attempt to reduce accidents. [The New York Times] • A pro-Israeli U.S. group called the singer Lorde a “bigot” in a full-page ad in The Washington Post. […]

Asia and Australia Edition: Barack Obama, North Korea, Big Tech: Your Thursday Briefing

#briefing-market-module.interactive-embedded .interactive-caption { display: none; } Market Snapshot View Full Overview In the News Photo Credit Reuters • A court in Myanmar extended the detention of two Reuters journalists for another 14 days. The two had been reporting on the Rakhine State, the site of a military crackdown on ethnic Rohingya Muslims. [The New York Times] • Japan’s Supreme Court upheld a not-guilty verdict for a woman who eluded the police for 17 years following a cult’s deadly crime spree, including a 1995 nerve gas attack in Tokyo. [The Asahi Shimbun] Continue reading the main story • An Australian grandmother escaped the death penalty in Malaysia after a court accepted her argument that she had been unaware of 2.4 pounds of crystal methamphetamine in her luggage. […]

Asia and Australia Edition: Barack Obama, North Korea, Big Tech: Your Thursday Briefing

#briefing-market-module.interactive-embedded .interactive-caption { display: none; } Market Snapshot View Full Overview In the News Photo Credit Reuters • A court in Myanmar extended the detention of two Reuters journalists for another 14 days. The two had been reporting on the Rakhine State, the site of a military crackdown on ethnic Rohingya Muslims. [The New York Times] • Japan’s Supreme Court upheld a not-guilty verdict for a woman who eluded the police for 17 years following a cult’s deadly crime spree, including a 1995 nerve gas attack in Tokyo. [The Asahi Shimbun] Continue reading the main story • An Australian grandmother escaped the death penalty in Malaysia after a court accepted her argument that she had been unaware of 2.4 pounds of crystal methamphetamine in her luggage. [BBC] • In South Korea, prosecutors asked to extend the prison term of Lee Jae-yong, the heir to the Samsung empire also known as Jay Y. Lee, in an appeal of Mr. […]

Homeland Security Increasingly Means Putting Agents Outside the Homeland

A surveillance mission earlier this month with Homeland Security agents in drug transit zones near South America highlights the department’s efforts to push out the border. Just after takeoff from a Costa Rican airfield, a crew of agents aboard a Customs and Border Protection surveillance plane began tracking a low-flying aircraft that appeared to be headed south toward Ecuador.The aircraft, which intelligence reports reviewed by agents indicated had no flight plan, flew just a few hundred feet above the ocean — an apparent attempt to avoid detection by radar.“When they are flying that low, they’re probably up to no good,” said Timothy Flynn, a senior detection agent, watching the plane on a radar screen.An hour later, and hiding in the cloud cover to stay out of sight, the American P-3 pulled up behind the plane. An agent with a long-lens digital camera snapped a string of photos of the plane’s tail number and other identifying details. Mr. Flynn radioed the information to authorities in Ecuador who were waiting when the plane landed, arresting seven people and seizing more than 800 pounds of cocaine aboard.PhotoSuspected members of the “Yahoo Boys,” a Nigerian criminal ring, were arrested by Homeland Security Investigations agents and the South African Police Service in Pretoria in 2014.Credit Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Homeland Security InvestigationsEcuador may embrace the Homeland Security agents, but other allies say the department’s foreign reach is a stretch.In Germany, some lawmakers have questioned the department’s counterterrorism Immigration Advisory Program, where travelers at foreign airports are investigated and sometimes interviewed by plainclothes Customs and Border Protection officers before they are allowed to board flights to the United States.Those American officers can recommend that airlines deny boarding to foreign passengers. A Government Accountability Office report found that the customs officers stopped 8,100 known or suspected terrorists, or individuals with connections to terrorist groups, from traveling to the United States in 2015, the most recent year that data is available.Continue reading the main storyBut Andrej Hunko, a member of the Germany’s Left Party, said the actions amount to an extrajudicial travel ban and accused the United States of moving its “immigration controls to European countries.”Canadians flooded their prime minister’s office in August with letters and emails protesting legislation to allow American customs officers stationed at Canadian airports and train stations to question, search and detain Canadian citizens. Unnamed government officials told the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation that the volume of mail received was “unprecedented” and took officials by surprise.The measure passed two weeks ago after Ralph Goodale, Canada’s public safety minister, assured Parliament that the American officers would rarely use their authority to question or detain Canadian citizens. More than 400 Homeland Security employees are stationed in Canada — the most of any foreign country — which Mr. Goodale called a benefit to both nations.“We face shared threats from drug smugglers, terrorists and human traffickers, and we could do things over the phone,” Mr […]

Asia and Australia Edition: Zimbabwe, Toshiba, Manus Island: Your Monday Briefing

#briefing-market-module.interactive-embedded .interactive-caption { display: none; } Market Snapshot View Full Overview In the News Photo Credit Ryan Mcmorrow/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images • An apartment-building fire in Beijing’s scrappy outskirts killed at least 19 people, many of them migrant workers trapped in thick smoke that witnesses said smelled of chemicals. [The New York Times] • China’s foreign minister, Wang Yi, visited Myanmar and outlined a “three-stage plan” to help resolve the Rohingya crisis. [South China Morning Post] • A Japanese driver was killed in a collision with a U.S. military truck driven by a Marine stationed in Okinawa. The Marine was three times over the legal blood-alcohol limit, local news media said. [The New York Times] Continue reading the main story • Two former South Korean spy chiefs were arrested and a third was questioned a second time about illegally channeling money to Park Geun-hye before her presidency ended in disgraced […]

How Senate Republicans Have Reacted to the Roy Moore Allegations

Here is a roundup of how the Senate’s 52 Republicans have responded.‘I can no longer endorse his candidacy’PhotoSenator John McCain of Arizona called the allegations against Mr. Moore “deeply disturbing and disqualifying.”Credit Tom Brenner/The New York TimesMr. […]