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  • El cisne negro. Nueva edición ampliada y revisada - Nassim Nicholas Taleb October 21, 2017
    ¿Qué es un cisne negro? Para empezar, es un suceso improbable, sus consecuencias son importantes y todas las explicaciones que se puedan ofrecer a posteriori no tienen en cuenta el azar y sólo buscan encajar lo imprevisible en un modelo perfecto. El éxito de Google y You Tube, y hasta ell 11-S, son “cisnes negros”. Para Nassim Nicholas Taleb, los cisnes negr […]
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  • La teoría del todo - Stephen W. Hawking October 21, 2017
    Una manera clara y amena de acercarse a los misterios del universo. En esta esclarecedora obra, el gran físico británico Stephen Hawking nos ofrece una historia del universo, del big bang a los agujeros negros. En siete pasos, Hawking logra explicar la historia del universo, desde las primeras teorías del mundo griego y de la época medieval hasta las más com […]
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  • Ágilmente - Estanislao Bachrach October 21, 2017
    Bachrach es Doctor en biología molecular y explica el funcionamiento del cerebro. A través de ello, da consejos y herramientas para ser más creativos y felices en el trabajo y en la vida. La neurociencia es clara: el cerebro aprende hasta el último día de vida. La creatividad puede expandirse. Tu mente, mediante la aplicación de las técnicas correctas, puede […]
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  • Sobre la teoría de la relatividad especial y general - Albert Einstein October 21, 2017
    Entre el Electromagnetismo y la Mecánica newtoniana existe una fórmula de bisagra: la teoría de la relatividad especial y general. La importancia del nuevo marco planteado por Albert Einstein se entiende por lo siguiente: la percepción del tiempo y el espacio es relativa al observador. ¿Qué significa esto? Si usted viaja a una velocidad mayor que la de la lu […]
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  • Breve historia de mi vida - Stephen Hawking October 21, 2017
    La mente maravillosa de Stephen Hawking ha deslumbrado al mundo entero revelando los misterios del universo. Ahora, por primera vez, el cosmólogo más brillante de nuestra era explora, con una mirada reveladora, su propia vida y evolución intelectual. Breve historia de mi vida cuenta el sorprendente viaje de Stephen Hawking desde su niñez […]
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  • La física del futuro - Michio Kaku October 21, 2017
    Un recorrido asombroso a través de los próximos cien años de revolución científica. El futuro ya se está inventando en los laboratorios de los científicos más punteros de todo el mundo. Con toda probabilidad, en 2100 controlaremos los ordenadores a través de diminutos sensores cerebrales y podremos mover objetos con el poder de nuestras mentes, la inteligenc […]
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  • ¿Cómo pensar como Sherlock Holmes? - Maria Konnikova October 21, 2017
    Ningún personaje de ficción es más conocido por sus poderes de intuición y observación que Sherlock Holmes. Pero, ¿es su inteligencia extraordinaria una invención de la ficción o podemos aprender a desarrollar estas habilidades, para mejorar nuestras vidas en el trabajo y en casa? A través de ¿ Cómo pensar como Sherlock Holmes? , la periodista y psicóloga Ma […]
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  • EnCambio - Estanislao Bachrach October 21, 2017
    EnCambio te va a permitir alumbrar los procesos por los cuales te comportás de determinada manera con el fin de dejar atrás aquellos hábitos y conductas que ya no te sirven. El objetivo es que aprendas del potencial que tiene tu cerebro para cambiar y la capacidad que tenés vos para modificarlo. Este año cambio de trabajo, empiezo el gimnasio, bajo esos kili […]
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  • Tricks Any Dog Can Do! - Susan Day October 21, 2017
    This great book comes with advice and guidance as to the best way to teach these tricks. It offers more than one method which the reader can choose depending upon their own situation. There is also advice to using treats and shows you how to not end up with a treat junkie! This books is from the desk of Susan Day, a canine behaviourist. Susan teaches obedien […]
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  • Una mochila para el universo - Elsa Punset October 21, 2017
    ¿Cuánto debe durar un abrazo? ¿De qué sirve llorar? ¿Qué podemos hacer para cambiar nuestra suerte? ¿Tiene algún propósito el enamoramiento? ¿Y por qué es tan inevitable el desamor? ¿Cómo aprendemosa tener miedo? ¿A partir de qué edad empezamos a mentir? ¿Por qué sentimos envidia? ¿Cuántos amigos necesitamos para ser felices? ¿Podemos evitar estresarnos sin […]
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Microsoft C.E.O. Says Tech’s Progress on Gender Equality Is ‘Not Sufficient’

Mr. Nadella, who joined Microsoft in 1992, touched on a range of topics during the talk in Manhattan, discussing privacy, gaming, immigration and the effect of artificial intelligence on jobs.Mr. Nadella said that immigrants — and not just those with highly valued skills — help improve competition. […]

Asia and Australia Edition: Hurricane Maria, Mexico City, Iran: Your Thursday Briefing

#briefing-market-module.interactive-embedded .interactive-caption { display: none; } Market Snapshot View Full Overview In the News Photo Credit Made Nagi/European Pressphoto Agency • The Indonesian authorities raised alert levels for Mount Agung, on the resort island of Bali, after hundreds of tremors stoked fears it could erupt for the first time since 1963, when it killed more than 1,000 people. [NDTV] • Singapore’s prime minister, Lee Hsien Loong, surprised observers by meeting with Beijing’s anti-graft chief, Wang Qishan, during his visit to China. [South China Morning Post] • A request for documents from the White House revealed telling details to date about the breadth of the special counsel’s investigation, including that some lines of inquiry focus squarely on Mr. Trump’s behavior as president. [The New York Times] Continue reading the main story • Amazon is reviewing its website after a British report said the online retail giant’s algorithms were suggesting bomb-making ingredients that were “Frequently bought together.” [The New York Times] • Shanghai police are using facial recognition software to crack down on errant cyclists. [Shanghai Daily] • Video of a recent dam overflow in Laos shows workers running for their lives. [9News] • The Philippines’ lower house of Congress agreed to restore the $13 million budget of the human rights commission, which had been slashed to $20 by lawmakers allied with President Rodrigo Duterte. [Reuters] • From the Op-Ed desk: A Filipino professor argues that President Duterte’s “enablers” — the cogs in his political machinery — are also to blame for the thousands of deaths in the country’s brutal antidrug war. […]

California Today: California Today: A Spreading ‘Yimby’ Movement

Fifty or so stark white crosses dot the desolate road leading to a military training facility in the Mojave Desert.Each one marks the site of a fatal vehicle crash and is stenciled in black with the date it happened.Fort Irwin Road stretches just 31 miles between the Barstow area and Fort Irwin National Training Center, where Army soldiers are sent to get combat ready.Since the military post’s opening in the early 1980s, dozens of soldiers and civilians have died on the two-lane road in accidents linked to speed, fatigue, carelessness — and the design of the road itself.Continue reading the main storyPaved in the 1940s, it had no shoulders, with its edges flush to the desert floor on either side.If a vehicle drifted even slightly off the pavement, a wheel was apt to catch in the sand, said Ken Drylie, a spokesman for the training center.“You put one tire in the dirt and you’re upside down,” he said. “It was going to be a rollover.”The placement of crosses by Fort Irwin officials was initially intended as a warning to motorists, and then grew over time into a ritual.Thankfully, it has become more infrequent since safety upgrades were made about 12 years ago, including passing lanes, shoulders and rumble strips that warn drivers as they drift.Frank Foster, a photographer based in Victor Valley, captured a series of images along Fort Irwin Road.He encountered a few crosses with children’s toys placed on them. “There is one set of crosses where it looks like an entire family was wiped out in a crash” he said. “It was chilling to say the least.”Mr. Foster shared some of his images with us:PhotoCredit Frank FosterPhotoCredit Frank FosterPhotoCredit Frank FosterPhotoCredit Frank FosterWant to submit a photo for possible publication? You can do it here.California Today goes live at 6 a.m. Pacific time weekdays […]

California Today: California Today: A Plan to Cool Down L.A.

California Online (Please note: We regularly highlight articles on sites that have limited access for nonsubscribers.) • An effort to outlaw child marriage in California is facing opposition from the A.C.L.U. [San Francisco Chronicle] Continue reading the main story • “Toxic taps” — How unsafe drinking water is threatening untold numbers of Californians. [News Deeply] • “Yes, I know President Trump is trying to get out of the Paris agreement, but he doesn’t speak for the rest of America,” said Gov. Jerry Brown. [The New York Times] Photo A purported missile launch in Tongchang-ri in North Pyongan Province, North Korea, in March. Credit Korean Central News Agency, via Associated Press • The Pentagon wanted better eyes on North Korea’s missile program. A fleet of tiny satellites from Silicon Valley may be the answer. [The New York Times] • John R. Quinn died at 88. As the archbishop of San Francisco in the 1980s and ’90s, he resolutely addressed the AIDS crisis […]

New Cyberattack Spreads in Europe, Russia and U.S.

The vulnerability used by Eternal Blue was patched by Microsoft last April, but as the WannaCry attacks demonstrated, hundreds of thousands of organizations around the world failed to properly install the patch. But researchers at F-Secure, the Finnish cybersecurity firm, also noted that the ransomware used at least two other vectors to spread, beyond Eternal Blue, which suggests even those who used the Microsoft patch could be vulnerable. “Just because you roll out a patch doesn’t mean it’ll be put in place quickly,” said Carl Herberger, vice president of security at Radware. “The more bureaucratic an organization is, the higher chance it won’t have updated its software.” Immediate reports that the computer virus was a variant of Petya suggest the attackers will be hard to trace. Petya was for sale on the so-called dark web, where its creators made the ransomware available as “ransomware as a service” — a play on Silicon Valley terminology for delivering software over the internet, according to the security firm Avast Threat Labs. That means anyone can launch the ransomware with the click of a button, encrypt someone’s systems and demand a ransom to unlock it. If the victim pays, the authors of the Petya ransomware, who call themselves Janus Cybercrime Solutions, get a cut of the payment. That distribution model means that pinning down the individuals responsible for Tuesday’s attack could be difficult, if nearly impossible […]

California’s a climate leader — if we’re grading on a curve

California just got its climate report card and we’re betting the state wants to hide this one from its parents.

The Golden State has been cramming to clean up its greenhouse-gas grades for more than a decade, and Gov. Jerry Brown has pledged to fight President Donald Trump’s efforts to roll back climate action. So when Trump dropped out of the Paris agreement earlier this month, California was all like, “Whatever dude, I’m going to work even harder, and score the winning touchdown, and graduate for all of us!”

To put it another way, California has set lofty goals and now wants to set them even higher.

“There’s support for more aggressive California climate action,” says Meredith Fowlie, an environmental economist at the University of California, Berkeley. “California is determined to step up, particularly as Washington pulls back.”

The problem is, the state has struggled to hit the targets it already set. After psyching itself up to take on the world, California has taken some important steps forward, but it looks like it has also taken the a few bong hits and a lot of naps. The Golden State wants to bring its greenhouse gas emissions down to 40 percent below 1990 levels by 2030, but it’s not on pace to get there, according to the state’s annual inventory of greenhouse gas emissions. That target looks so far away, Fowlie says, that it “makes the much-celebrated greenhouse gas emissions reductions we’ve achieved so far look timid.”

The state will need new policies, including a stronger cap-and-trade program, to improve its pace, Fowlie and other experts say.

Using the California Environmental Protection Agency’s recent report, we’ve created a handy report card, grading California in four key areas.

Getting the economy off carbon: Great effort! (but not fast enough)

California is bringing down emissions even as the state’s population (39 million and counting) and economy keeps growing. That’s great news as well as a monumental change.

Until recently, an uptick in the economy meant an uptick in greenhouse gas emissions; you couldn’t have one without the other. But now emissions are dropping as California’s businesses boom.

However, the state is still burning more than its share of dinosaur slime. The average Californian still emits more than 11 metric tonnes of carbon dioxide every year, a little over twice the world average.

Transportation: Backsliding (see teacher)

Share of emissions: 37 percent

Planes, trucks, cars, and the like are the biggest source of emissions in the state, and their emissions are headed in the wrong direction. That’s because, after years of burning less fuel, Californians are back behind the wheel and most likely sitting in traffic. Cheap gas takes some of the blame.

Sharp-eyed readers will notice a similarity between the orange line above, which tracks total emissions from transportation, and the next graph, which shows how much Americans drive. Hence, Silicon Valley’s dream of a nation getting ferried around in electric-powered self-driving cars.

Electricity: Improving (but stole answers from classmates)

Share of emissions: 19 percent

Every year, it takes less carbon to power Silicon Valley’s smartphones, Hollywood’s cameras, and Humboldt’s grow lights. Hooray! It’s not because the technology is getting greener. California is getting more of its electrons from wind turbines and solar plants. But if you look closely at these graphs, you can see that improvement comes from sucking clean electricity away from other states.

California just hasn’t managed to increase the amount of carbon-free electricity it produces in state.

How can this be? It seems like there are new solar panels going up all the time in California. It turns out that all those new renewables weren’t enough to make up for the loss of electricity when the state shut down nuclear plants and droughts shut down hydropower. Another graph (Figure 10) reveals what’s happening: Natural gas has replaced most of the electricity that was coming from dams and nuclear plants.

Industry: No improvement (please see doctor about unhealthy gas leakage)

Share of emissions: 21 percent

California’s wineries, cement plants, and aerospace companies are mostly just treading water. We could go searching for silver linings here and find some improvement (look, emissions from refineries are falling!) but let’s be real: This is disappointing.

The problem is that most of these emissions come from combustion; that is, industry burns stuff to make other stuff. You’ve got to get limestone really hot to make cement, and you need a fiery forge to turn steel into a Tesla or a BPA-free water bottle. People are starting to figure out more environmentally friendly manufacturing techniques, but they are still new, and therefore really expensive.

Also, remember that big gas leak at Aliso Canyon? It’s captured by these numbers.

Final grade: C-

(Young California has lots of potential, but hasn’t turned ambition into enough progress)

This may seem like a harsh assessment, but we are measuring the Golden State against its own expectations, not against Wyoming or North Korea. Basically, California is great at making big promises about defying Trump and fighting climate change. It’s not yet good enough at walking the walk. Not to say that California is all talk. Jeffrey Greenblatt, a scientist at Lawrence Berkeley Lab who has been studying California’s efforts, says the state has made a lot of significant policy changes. Think green building standards, carbon sequestration efforts, and subsidies for electric cars and renewable energy. “The problem is that, even with all that, it’s not quite enough to get us to our targets,” Greenblatt says.

California’s climate team has a plan for upping the pace that depends on getting a new cap-and-trade law passed. A few weeks ago, one cap-and-trade bill failed a key vote. But there’s still time. The state legislature has a Democratic supermajority, and a Governor Moonbeam who cares deeply about climate change.

“We can’t fall back and give in to the climate deniers,” Gov. Brown said in his State of the State speech earlier this year. “The science is clear, the danger is real. We can do much on our own, and we can join with others — other states and provinces, even other countries — to stop the dangerous rise in climate pollution.”

The world needs this well-meaning slacker to turn into a climate valedictorian. One solid session of summer school could put the state on the right trajectory.

[…]

More peas or less Pepsi? Researchers compare how food policies could save lives.

There’s been much high-profile gushing over the spaceship-in-Eden–themed campus that Apple spent six years and $5 billion building in Silicon Valley, but it turns out techno-utopias don’t make great neighbors.

“Apple’s new HQ is a retrograde, literally inward-looking building with contempt for the city where it lives and cities in general,” writes Adam Rogers at Wired, in an indictment of the company’s approach to transportation, housing, and economics in the Bay Area.

The Ring — well, they can’t call it The Circle — is a solar-powered, passively cooled marvel of engineering, sure. But when it opens, it will house 12,000 Apple employees, 90 percent of whom will be making lengthy commutes to Cupertino and back every day. (San Francisco is 45 miles away.)

To accommodate that, Apple Park features a whopping 9,000 parking spots (presumably the other 3,000 employees will use the private shuttle bus instead). Those 9,000 cars will be an added burden on the region’s traffic problems, as Wired reports, not to mention that whole global carbon pollution thing.

You can read Roger’s full piece here, but the takeaway is simple: With so much money, Apple could have made meaningful improvements to the community — building state-of-the-art mass transit, for example — but chose to make a sparkly, exclusionary statement instead.

[…]