DreamHost

TARGET: Save with the Red Card!

Subscribe

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Green Apps

ITUNES TV AND MOVIES

Categories

Burpee Gardening

Whole House Water Filter

PINGO

Soft Phone Banner

RE USE IT!

ReUseIt.com

Natural Mosquito Control

10% Off Mosquito Magnet Accessories - Use Code MMACCTEN

FTC Disclosure

Green Reflection may receive remuneration from the advertisers on this site.

As Labor Pool Shrinks, Prison Time Is Less of a Hiring Hurdle

NYT

Read the original here: As Labor Pool Shrinks, Prison Time Is Less of a Hiring Hurdle

Senators Scramble to Advance Tax Bill That Increasingly Rewards Wealthy

At the heart of the debate is whether to more favorably treat small businesses and other so-called pass-through entities — businesses whose profits are distributed to their owners and taxed at rates for individuals. Seventy percent of pass-through income flows to the top 1 percent of American earners, according to research by Owen Zidar, an economist at the University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business.GraphicWhich Republican Senators Might Oppose the Tax Bill, and WhySenate leaders would need to win over several Republican senators to pass a tax overhaul.OPEN GraphicTwo Republican senators, Ron Johnson of Wisconsin and Steve Daines of Montana, have said that they will vote against the plan if it does not do more to help the owners of those businesses, possibly by increasing the individual income tax deduction for such owners from the 17.4 percent rate currently in the Senate bill.Republicans, who control the Senate 52 to 48, can afford to lose only two of their members if they hope to pass the bill on party lines in the upper chamber.Mr. Johnson could stall the bill by himself on Tuesday, when it is scheduled for a vote in the Senate Budget Committee. Mr. Johnson sits on that committee, where Republicans have a single-vote majority. On Monday, he said he would vote “no” unless his concerns were addressed.“I need a fix beforehand,” Mr. Johnson said.Earlier in the day, Senator John Cornyn, Republican of Texas and the majority whip, said, “There’s no deal, but there’s been some discussions on how to address Senator Johnson and Senator Daines’s concerns.” He continued, “We’re trying to be responsive.”Adding to the uncertainty, Senator Bob Corker of Tennessee also said on Monday that he could be a “no” vote in the Budget Committee if his concerns about the bill’s effect on the deficit were not adequately addressed.Orrin G. Hatch, Republican of Utah, who leads the Senate Finance Committee, said that there was a strong desire to get a bill passed by Friday and that additional changes would most likely be made on the Senate floor. Despite speculation that the House will face pressure to quickly vote upon whatever passes in the Senate, Senator Rob Portman, Republican of Ohio, said he “fully expects” that there would be a conference to bridge differences between the House and Senate plans.Republican Tax Plan: How to Make Sense of the Push in CongressIt’s virtually impossible to fully understand, let alone keep up with, the flood of proposals, amendments and analyses that continue to pour out. Here are some of the big-picture ideas to keep in mind as this political sausage is being made.The pass-through fight is the first skirmish in what lawmakers and lobbyists expect will be a frenzied week, which Republican leaders hope will produce the first major legislative victory of the Trump-era for their party.Continue reading the main storyThe week is expected to be punctuated by behind-the-scenes arm twisting and deal making as party leaders work to allay senators’ worries without exceeding their self-imposed $1.5 trillion budget for tax cuts […]

Trump Finds That Demolishing Obama’s Legacy Is Not So Simple

Yet there is little appetite among America’s partners to revisit the Iran deal, nor is there much eagerness among lawmakers to cancel the existing health care program without a new system to install in its stead.VideoTrump on G.O.P.’s Failed Health Care BillThe president spoke today about the collapse of the Republicans’ plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.By THE NEW YORK TIMES.Photo by Tom Brenner/The New York Times.Watch in Times Video »embed The latter notion seemed to die almost immediately on Capitol Hill on Tuesday, leaving the president to throw up his hands and say he would simply let Mr. Obama’s program die of its own weight. “I’m not going to own it,” he told reporters. “I can tell you the Republicans are not going to own it. We’ll let Obamacare fail, and then the Democrats are going to come to us.”Nearly every president arrives in office promising a new direction, especially those succeeding someone from the other party. But few, if any, have spent as much of their early months focused on undoing what the last president did rather than promoting their own proactive ideas as Mr. Trump has.Where the president has succeeded so far, it has largely been in cases where he could act on his own authority. He approved the Keystone XL pipeline that Mr. Obama had rejected. He pulled out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal and the Paris climate change accord that his predecessor had negotiated. […]

Governors Give Chilly Reception to Health Bill Push

The timing is critical because the Senate is expected to take up its health care overhaul this week, and Republicans — who control the body with a slim 52-vote majority — have already lost the support of two of their senators. Losing one more Republican senator would effectively sink the legislation, and a handful of Republican senators from states that have expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act have signaled they will closely follow the lead of their state’s governor.Continue reading the main storyAt a private luncheon for governors on Saturday, three Democratic governors called for the group to release some sort of joint, bipartisan statement on the health bill. Gov. Dannel P. Malloy of Connecticut proposed a letter formally opposing the Senate legislation, while Gov. Terry McAuliffe of Virginia, the chairman of the National Governors Association, and Gov. Steve Bullock of Montana suggested a more restrained approach that would communicate their unease with the measure. But a handful of Republican governors opposed making a collective statement, noting there was no broad agreement about the nature of their opposition.“It’s important if anything goes out under the name of the N.G.A. that it has the endorsement of members certainly, and I think there was not consensus on that,” Gov. […]

Gerrymandering Case Echoes in Inkblot-Like Districts Across the U.S.

Benjamin Geffen, a lawyer at the Public Interest Law Center working on the case, said that while the suit had been filed in state court, not federal court, he was watching the Wisconsin case closely, because the Pennsylvania lawsuit makes a similar argument about what academics call “the efficiency gap,” a measure of votes considered wasted in districts designed not to be close.Continue reading the main story“We’re optimistic that the court will at last recognize that there is a point at which a partisan gerrymander goes too far,” Mr. Geffen said in a phone interview.Maryland’s Sixth Congressional DistrictDemocrats in Maryland drew plenty of crazily shaped districts to help their party in 2011 — its Third District has been likened to a “praying mantis” — but a federal lawsuit challenging the state’s last round of redistricting is focused on one: the Sixth District, which yoked Democratic voters from the Washington suburbs to Republican voters in the rural west of the state.Maryland’s 6th Congressional DistrictMichael B. Kimberly, the lawyer bringing the suit, said he had been watching the Wisconsin case. But he said his suit was taking a somewhat different tack, arguing that the new Maryland map violated the First Amendment rights of voters.“This is far and away the most promising time for legal challenges to partisan gerrymandering that we’ve seen in a generation,” he said in a telephone interview.The Wisconsin EffectSeveral election lawyers said it was unclear how far-reaching a Supreme Court ruling in the Wisconsin case might be, given that other election maps are being challenged at federal and state levels using different legal arguments. (North Carolina, which has already redrawn its maps after a challenge, is now facing challenges to its new map.) But they said it was an important moment — and noted that it could change the landscape when states begin working on their next set of election maps a few years from now.Wisconsin’s State Assembly Districts“The Supreme Court is a pretty big planet, and its gravitational pull is pretty strong,” said Justin Levitt, a professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles who tracks redistricting cases on his All About Redistricting website.He said the compactness of a district — and how squiggly or rectangular it was — was rarely a good indication of how gerrymandered it is. He noted that some unusually drawn districts had beneficial effects, including one in Illinois that created a heavily Latino district.Indeed, one of the defenses made by Wisconsin officials is that their districts are compact. But in November a federal court found that they were an “unconstitutional political gerrymander.”“They don’t look bizarre,” William Whitford, one of the Democratic plaintiffs suing over the Wisconsin map, said Monday on a conference call with reporters. “But if you really know the Wisconsin political geography — and that’s a learning curve […]

Sidebar: When Does Political Gerrymandering Cross a Constitutional Line?

NYT

Go here to see the original: Sidebar: When Does Political Gerrymandering Cross a Constitutional Line?

Trump Signs Order That Could Lead to Curbs on Foreign Workers

NYT

Read more from the original source: Trump Signs Order That Could Lead to Curbs on Foreign Workers