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trump presidency: State of the Union Fact-Check

SubscribeLog In SubscribeLog InAdvertisementPoliticstrump presidencyState of the Union Fact-CheckImagePresident Trump at The State of the Union on Tuesday night.CreditGabriella Demczuk for The New York TimesBy Linda Qiu Jan. 30, 2018Reporters from The New York Times checked the facts, falsehoods and statements in need of context from President Trump’s first State of the Union address. Watch a replay along with real time analysis here and an annotated transcript of the speech.economy“Since the election, we have created 2.4 million new jobs, including 200,000 new jobs in manufacturing alone.”The math is correct, but context matters.The economy has added about 169,000 jobs a month since the 2016 election, but that is somewhat slower than the 185,000 jobs per month that the economy added over the previous seven years.—Binyamin Appelbaumeconomy“African-American unemployment stands at the lowest rate ever recorded.”True, but needs context.It’s true that the black unemployment was the lowest recorded, 6.8 percent in December. But also the culmination of a longer-term trend. Moreover, it’s an open question how much credit a president, especially in his first year, can take for the economy.—Linda Qiueconomy”After years of wage stagnation, we are finally seeing rising wages.”False.Wages are, in fact, rising — but at a slower rate than they were at the end of President Obama’s second term.— Jim Tankersleyhealth care“We eliminated an especially cruel tax that fell mostly on Americans making less than $50,000 a year — forcing them to pay tremendous penalties simply because they couldn’t afford government-ordered health plans. We repealed the core of disastrous Obamacare — the individual mandate is now gone.’’True, but needs context.In the newly-passed tax law, Congress eliminated penalties for people who go without health insurance, starting in 2019. An estimated 4.5 percent of taxpayers paid the penalty in 2015, and nearly 60 percent of those who did earned less than $50,000 in 2015 — though the Kaiser Family Foundation found that a sizable amount of low-income Americans paying the penalty could find coverage for less.People could, in many cases, obtain exemptions from the penalties that were indeed a major element of the Affordable Care Act. Other elements of the health care law remain intact.—Robert Peareconomy”Apple has just announced its plans to invest a total of $350 billion in America, and hire another 20,000 workers.”This needs context […]

Most Americans Want Legal Status for ‘Dreamers.’ These People Don’t.

“I think DACA recipients should be given a few months to get their affairs in order and return to their home countries,” said Ms. Sterry, 58, a former math teacher, referring to the Obama-era program, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, that President Trump has ended but which could be revived or replaced in a congressional deal.And to those who contend that the young immigrants would be marooned in a country they do not remember, Ms. Sterry says: “Parents and children can all go home together.”Less than a quarter of American voters, and in some polls as few as one in 10, share Ms. Sterry’s beliefs. But they show how the country’s conflicted emotions about undocumented immigrants have stymied legislation for more than a decade, polarizing both parties and most recently leading to the short-lived government shutdown that still did not settle the issue.Their counterparts on the liberal side are the progressives who are upset with Senate Democrats like Chuck Schumer, the minority leader, for allowing the government to reopen without a guarantee of protection for DACA recipients, known as Dreamers.On the Republican side, moderates are feeling the pull of hard-line members who want any legalization bill to incorporate significant changes to immigration enforcement, including measures Democrats generally oppose, such as funding for a border wall, a sharp reduction in overall migration, and a shift to merit-based admissions from a family-based system that critics call “chain migration.”GraphicA Typical ‘Dreamer’ Lives in Los Angeles, Is From Mexico and Came to the U.S. at 6 Years OldThere are roughly 800,000 current beneficiaries of the DACA program. […]

As Trump Appeals to Farmers, Some of His Policies Don’t

“What we often see communicated about rural America is that there are these isolated pockets of despair that are beyond hope or recovery,” Ray Starling, the special assistant to the president for agriculture, agricultural trade and food assistance on the National Economic Council, said in a briefing Friday. The report makes clear that “that’s not what we believe.”Yet some of the president’s economic policies could actually harm the farm industry. New analyses of the tax law by economists at the Department of Agriculture suggest it could actually lower farm output in the years to come and effectively raise taxes on the lowest-earning farm households, while delivering large gains for the richest farmers.And the administration’s trade policies continue to be a concern for farmers, who benefit from access to other markets, including by exporting their products. Mr. Trump continues to threaten to withdraw from trade pacts if other countries do not grant the United States a better deal, a position that has put him at odds with much of the farm industry.“Trade has become an increasingly important and substantial part of the ag economy. So anything that causes a ripple in that can have not just little effects but significant effects,” said Dale Moore, the executive director for public policy at the Farm Bureau.Indeed, part of the White House report Monday is expected to discuss global markets’ importance to rural America.Agriculture has been the biggest beneficiary of pacts like the North American Free Trade Agreement, which have allowed the United States to export grains and meat. In April, when the president came to the brink of withdrawing the United States from the pact, Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue helped to dissuade him by showing him a map of the part of the country that would be hardest hit — farming states that also helped to elect Mr. Trump.“It creates a lot of anxiety across all of agriculture, particularly the U.S. pulling out of Nafta,” said Kevin Kester, a rancher in California and the president-elect of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association.Continue reading the main storyFarmers and ranchers like Mr. Kester worry that they are losing ground to foreign competitors, as major markets like Japan, Europe and Mexico push ahead with their own trade pacts. […]

Trump’s Way: Stoking Fears, Trump Defied Bureaucracy to Advance Immigration Agenda

More Disciplined ApproachCecilia Muñoz, who served as Mr. Obama’s chief domestic policy adviser, said she was alarmed by the speed with which Mr. Trump and his team have learned to put their immigration agenda into effect.“The travel ban was a case of bureaucratic incompetence,” she said. “They made rookie mistakes. But they clearly learned from that experience. For the moment, all of the momentum is in the direction of very ugly, very extreme, very harmful policies.”By year’s end, the chaos and disorganization that marked Mr. Trump’s earliest actions on immigration had given way to a more disciplined approach that yielded concrete results, steered in large part by Mr. […]

Texas Church Shooting Leaves at Least 26 Dead, Officials Say

PhotoJayanthony Hernandez, 12, center, was comforted by his mother, Mona Rodriguez, at a vigil at the Sutherland Springs, Tex., post office on Sunday night.Credit Todd Heisler/The New York TimesSUTHERLAND SPRINGS, Tex. — A gunman clad in all black, with a ballistic vest strapped to his chest and a military-style rifle in his hands, opened fire on parishioners at a Sunday service at a small Baptist church in rural Texas, killing at least 26 people and turning this tiny town east of San Antonio into the scene of the country’s newest mass horror.The gunman was identified as Devin Patrick Kelley, 26, according to two law enforcement officials who spoke on the condition of anonymity because the investigation was continuing. Mr. […]

J.F.K. Files, Though Incomplete, Are a Treasure Trove for Answer Seekers

Supported byPoliticsJ.F.K. Files, Though Incomplete, Are a Treasure Trove for Answer Seekers??????????????VideoThe J.F.K. […]

J.F.K. Files, Though Incomplete, Are a Treasure Trove for Answer Seekers

Supported byPoliticsJ.F.K. Files, Though Incomplete, Are a Treasure Trove for Answer Seekers??????????????VideoThe J.F.K. Assassination: A Cast of CharactersAs a new trove of documents about the killing of President John F. […]